PITR’s Top 5 Picks for Summer 2017

Let’s dive right into our Top 5 shows we’re looking forward to this summer!

Marcus Stevens (2)#5 – An Act of God – Pittsburgh Public Theater: A relatively new play, premiering on Broadway in 2015, An Act of God is a one-act comedy that originally started out as a series of tweets that evolved into the book of which the play was adapted from. Point Park University graduate Marcus Stevens plays God, joined by his sidekicks: angels Gabriel and Michael (John Shepard and Tim McGeever), in this comedy opening at the Pittsburgh Public June 9. For tickets and more information click here. 

#4 – Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play – 12 Peers Theater: Once you catch 12 Peer’s current production of Thom Pain: Based on Mr. Burns ImageNothing starring Pittsburgh’s own Matt Henderson, we’re sure you’ll be itching to see what else they have to offer. Opening August 3, Mr. Burns shoots us some years into the future after the apocalypse where we meet a handful of survivors trying to recreate a particular episode of “The Simpsons”. Fast forwarding into the future for Act 2, and even further for Act 3,  these reenactments become main forms of entertainment and eventually myths decades later. For tickets and more information, click here. 

#3 – Hot Metal Musicals – Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh (MTAP):Since Email-Blast-Image-c.PG-Web1-copyits creation, MTAP has set out to help create and promote new musicals and the artists creating them in Pittsburgh. The incubator was established in 2011 by Erik Schark and is now currently led by executive director Stephanie Riso, managing director Jeanne Drennan, and advisor Steve Cuden. The first Hot Metal Musicals showcase in 2015 was one of our first major events of that year, and after seeing the talents Pittsburgh had to offer then, we’re sure this year’s showcase on July 17 will knock our socks off. For tickets and more information click here. 

#2 – Momentum Festival – City Theatre Company: City Theatre, known as yt17-momentum-featurePittsburgh’s home for new plays, delivers on their promise to keep things fresh and new again this year by finishing out their season with their annual page-to-stage festival: Momentum. Featuring 5 different staged readings, this year’s lineup will include not one, but two shows in progress that will be fully produced in their 2017-2018 season. Hop in for a meet and greet and a staged reading this weekend starting June 1! For more information, click here!

18556456_10155486793559873_589745343035013449_o#1 – WordPlay – Bricolage Production Company: Sure, for the second year in a row, we’ve named Bricolage’s storytelling show WordPlay the #1 show we’re looking forward to this summer. But this time, WordPlay is no ordinary WordPlay. This time, Bricolage as team up with PERSAD CENTER, the nation’s second oldest licensed mental health counseling center specifically created to serve the LGBTQ community. Featuring tunes by Tracksploitation and stories by Nyri Bakkalian, Brian Broome, Cindy Howes, kelly e. parker and Ciora Thomas. And, as usual, hosted by Creator and Co-Producer Alan Olifson. Don’t miss out on this special edition WordPlay this weekend, starting June 2. Tickets and more information can be found here.

Summer Preview 2017

Summer Logo

A Letter from the Editor,

I would like to wish a happy unofficial start of summer to our marvelous readers! Because of you, we made it through another year here at Pittsburgh in the Round! As a special treat, we’ve put together one of our best season previews yet, including updates from old friends like MTAP and the Pittsburgh CLO, new friends like Split Stage Productions, and not one, but two Artist Spotlights!

Summertime is one of the busiest times of year for the Pittsburgh theater community, making it one of the busiest seasons for us here at Pittsburgh in the Round. There will be no shortage of reviews and articles and you may even see a few PITR exclusives!

With the release of this Summer Preview 2017, we’d also like to announce our latest Site Sponsor, the newly renamed Pittsburgh Festival Opera (formerly the Opera Theater of Pittsburgh). To find out more about their upcoming season, keep scrolling! If you or your theater or business would like to be featured in any of our advertising spots, please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@pghintheround.com!

Our team here keeps on growing so we’ll have plenty of content to keep you busy this summer. We would love to take this opportunity to thank all of you who continue to read the content we work so hard to bring you, engage with us on social media, and support all of these local theaters and companies that help the arts grow and thrive in Pittsburgh.

Here’s to another great summer,

Mara E. Nadolski
Editor in Chief, Pittsburgh in the Round


Let’s dive right into our Top 5 shows we’re looking forward to this summer!

Marcus Stevens (2)#5 – An Act of God – Pittsburgh Public Theater: A relatively new play, premiering on Broadway in 2015, An Act of God is a one-act comedy that originally started out as a series of tweets that evolved into the book of which the play was adapted from. Point Park University graduate Marcus Stevens plays God, joined by his sidekicks: angels Gabriel and Michael (John Shepard and Tim McGeever), in this comedy opening at the Pittsburgh Public June 9. For tickets and more information click here. 

#4 – Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play – 12 Peers Theater: Once you catch 12 Peer’s current production of Thom Pain: Based on Mr. Burns ImageNothing starring Pittsburgh’s own Matt Henderson, we’re sure you’ll be itching to see what else they have to offer. Opening August 3, Mr. Burns shoots us some years into the future after the apocalypse where we meet a handful of survivors trying to recreate a particular episode of “The Simpsons”. Fast forwarding into the future for Act 2, and even further for Act 3,  these reenactments become main forms of entertainment and eventually myths decades later. For tickets and more information, click here. 

#3 – Hot Metal Musicals – Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh (MTAP): Since Email-Blast-Image-c.PG-Web1-copyits creation, MTAP has set out to help create and promote new musicals and the artists creating them in Pittsburgh. The incubator was established in 2011 by Erik Schark and is now currently led by executive director Stephanie Riso, managing director Jeanne Drennan, and advisor Steve Cuden. The first Hot Metal Musicals showcase in 2015 was one of our first major events of that year, and after seeing the talents Pittsburgh had to offer then, we’re sure this year’s showcase on July 17 will knock our socks off. For tickets and more information click here. 

#2 – Momentum Festival – City Theatre Company: City Theatre, known as yt17-momentum-featurePittsburgh’s home for new plays, delivers on their promise to keep things fresh and new again this year by finishing out their season with their annual page-to-stage festival: Momentum. Featuring 5 different staged readings, this year’s lineup will include not one, but two shows in progress that will be fully produced in their 2017-2018 season. Hop in for a meet and greet and a staged reading this weekend starting June 1! For more information, click here!

18556456_10155486793559873_589745343035013449_o#1 – WordPlay – Bricolage Production Company: Sure, for the second year in a row, we’ve named Bricolage’s storytelling show WordPlay the #1 show we’re looking forward to this summer. But this time, WordPlay is no ordinary WordPlay. This time, Bricolage as team up with PERSAD CENTER, the nation’s second oldest licensed mental health counseling center specifically created to serve the LGBTQ community. Featuring tunes by Tracksploitation and stories by Nyri Bakkalian, Brian Broome, Cindy Howes, kelly e. parker and Ciora Thomas. And, as usual, hosted by Creator and Co-Producer Alan Olifson. Don’t miss out on this special edition WordPlay this weekend, starting June 2. Tickets and more information can be found here

If musicals are more your style, don’t worry, George has our 5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss this Summer here. 

Learn a little more about the people you’ve been hearing about for all these years in our Artist Spotlight series. This time around we’ve got two for you! Get the scoop on costume designer Tony Sirk and musical theater actor Quinn Patrick Shannon. 

Our opera expert George is always a regular at the Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s summer shows so he’s got the inside scoop on their upcoming season hereThey’ve even commissioned a new opera they’ll be debuting this year, Nicole went a step further and got us some more information on the new show A Gathering of Sons. 

Throughline Theatre Company has a new home and a new season to tell us about! Ringa even got a sneak peak on their 3rd show, check it out here

If our Top 5 Musicals article wasn’t enough to meet your musical needs, George caught up with Split Stage Productions and the Pittsburgh CLO!

Kinetic Theatre Company has some fun planned for us this summer and fall, check out Stephen’s preview here. 

In preparation of MTAP’s upcoming Hot Metal Musicals this July, reacquaint yourself with the Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh here. 

And last, but not least, a group of young Pittsburgh artists have come together to produce a cabaret night to showcase female talent in the industry to support Planned Parenthood, find out more here. 


 

Missing something? Here are some review highlights from the last few months!

Watch: A Haunting by Real/Time Interventions

The Philadelphia Story at Little Lake Theatre

La Rondine by Undercroft Opera

Anything Goes at McKeesport Little Theater

Falstaff by Resonance Works

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Prime Stage

Hercules Didn’t Wade in the Water at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre

Sive at PICT Classic Theatre

Tarzan by Pittsburgh Musical Theatre

Wife U at Carnegie Mellon Universtiy

The Summer King at the Pittsburgh Opera

What’s Missing?  by Corningworks

4.48 Psychosis at off the WALL

Collaborators by Quantum Theatre

Baltimore at the University of Pittsburgh

Sweet Charity at the Pittsburgh Playhouse

Bloody, Bloody Andrew Jackson by the Duquesne Red Masquers

Who’s Afraid of iVirginia Woolf? by Cup-A-Jo Productions

Love, Ethics, and Religion: Kinetic Theatre’s Season Lineup

11066705_363701277174275_7381434187525949191_nKinetic Theatre announces 2017 season – three exciting Pittsburgh premieres: Lucas Hnath’s The Christians, David Ives’ hilarious adaptation of Corneille’s The Liar, and Mike Bartlett’s Love, Love, Love. Full summer casting announced: David Whalen and Joshua Elijah Reese star in The Christians, Ethan Saks, Erika Strasburg, & Sam Tsoutsouvas lead the ensemble cast in The Liar.

The Kinetic Theatre Company’s Executive Producing Director Andrew Paul has lined up three thought provoking, engaging, and, more importantly “very real” dramas that question relationships, religion, and ethics for the Pittsburgh area that are sure to leave theater goers deep in thought and maybe leave their sensibilities exhausted.  Paul is beckoning audiences to:  “come on down: this is your life!” A bit of realism for everyone.

Paul is back in Pittsburgh this year once again to leave theater goers entertained but questioning “who they are” and how they fit into the worlds he has chosen to explore. According to Kinetic Theatre’s press release: “the mission of Kinetic Theatre Co. is three-fold: to explore the issues facing our diverse and rapidly changing world through the language of theatre, to value text, both classic and contemporary, as our primary source of inspiration, and to honor, value, and respectfully compensate the artist.”

Rife with experienced and highly successful actors, Paul’s works this year will most definitely have audiences questioning their core beliefs. Not shying away from topics steeped in debates, Mr. Paul is very careful to remain loyal to his supportive Pittsburgh fan base by presenting them with tales that provide a spin on traditionalist thinking.

Those familiar with his work formerly as founder and artistic director of PICT (Pittsburgh Irish  Classical Theatre) know him for his production of “risky” works, and, although he is no longer with PICT, it hasn’t stifled his willingness to move to the “next level” in challenging the sensibilities of his audiences.  He is single handedly providing Pittsburgh with theater worth seeing, adding to the tried and true knowledge that Pittsburgh is “someplace special” with “someplace thoughtful.”

When looking at the three plays he will be producing and directing, I found Paul to be a fearless producer and director who is not afraid to pull the proverbial plug on traditional beliefs, and Pittsburgh audiences should applaud his selections.Meeting with Mr. Paul in person, it was easy to sense the excitement and anticipation for Kinetic’s upcoming season and, as always, Pittsburgh in the Round will be paying close attention to these upcoming performances.

KINETIC CHRISTIANS LARGE SQUAREIn his first production The Christians, Paul is producing Lucas Hnath’s very timely, relevant, an unapologetic look at faith in America and challenge of understanding people’s belief systems. The Christians is a play loosely based on the life or Pastor Rob Bell who built a megachurch in Michigan. The play explores Bell’s – in this case named Pastor Paul (played by native Pittsburgher and fan favorite David Whalen) – disruptive life and his subsequent firing from his congregation because of his antithetical preaching. “Pastor Paul has spent 20 years successfully growing his church from a modest storefront to a gleaming megachurch, but he no longer believes in Hell; he (unrealistically) feels that his congregation will be happy to hear what he has to say. In a homily one Sunday morning that rocks the spiritual world of his congregation, which backfires and brings the congregation to its spiritual knees.”

Add to the drama is his troubled relationship with his Associate Pastor Joshua (played by another beloved Pittsburgher, Joshua Elija Reese) who feigns his proclamation and the church elders and congregation. This revelation rocks the foundations of the beliefs of his flock, which in turn is intended to disrupt the foundations of the audiences’ beliefs.  This timely feature explores an attack on the very Catholic and conservative belief that, according to Paul, if there is no hell, what motivation do we have in this life to obtain a pathway to heaven?

Paul utilizes the role of the “chorus” in this play, which is actually the congregation’s choir, providing background to the action taking place in the lives of Pastor Paul and his family, along with Associate Pastor Elijah’s battle for the souls of the believers. Additionally, as in most church services, Paul has all of his principles speaking the play using handheld microphones to present the very real feel of a church service.

The Christians is running June 16 through July 2, 2017 at the New Hazlett Theater on the North Shore.

KINETIC LIAR LARGE SQUAREKinetic Theatre’s second offering is The Liar, a David Ives comic production based on Corneille’s The Liar. According to Paul, The Liar is “a sparkling urban romance as fresh as the day Pierre Corneille wrote it, brilliantly adapted for today by All In the Timing’s David Ives. Paris, 1643.” In The Liar – which puts a modernist spin on a French classic – Dorante (Ethan Saks) is a charming young man newly arrived in the capital, and he has but a single flaw: he cannot tell the truth. In quick succession, he meets Cliton (Patrick Halley), a manservant who cannot tell a lie, and falls in love with Clarice (Erika Strasburg), a charming young woman whom he, unfortunately, mistakes for her friend Lucrece.

The entire play is replete with misunderstandings and a series of breathtakingly intricate lies and springs one of the Western world’s greatest comedies.  Even when it serves no discernible purpose, Dorante compulsively and ceaselessly makes false statements.  This sublimely funny adaptation, written in rhymed iambic pentameter, is packed full of verbal ingenuity and has thrilled audiences in New York and across the country. CMU Drama alums Ethan Saks and Erika Strasburg play Dorante, the title character, and Clarice, the object of his affections, with Kinetic associate artist Sam Tsoutsouvas as Dorante’s clueless father, Geronte. Sumptuous scenery by Gianni Downs and costumes by Kim Brown make this a visual feast to match Ives’ hilarious text.

The Liar runs from July 13 through July 30, 2017 at the Henry Heymann Theater on the campus of the University of Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning.

KINETIC LOVE LARGE SQUAREWith religion and ethics having been explored, Kinetic Theatre’s third and final production this year is Mike Bartlett’s comedy Love, Love, Love. The show serves basically as an indictment on the “baby boomer” generation. This offering, divided up into three acts, explores the lives of a couple who meet and marry in the era of the Beatles – 1967 – the years of drugs, sex, and rock and roll – to their lives in typical suburbia in 1990 raising two children who are antagonist to their parents, to the final scene which takes place in 2011 when their ungrateful daughter shows up and demands that her parents buy her a house because they “owe her a life” that they didn’t provide her growing up. The main characters advance from the ages of 19 to 64. Love, Love, Love, states New York Times critic Ben Brantley in his rave review of the play’s American Premiere last November at the Roundabout Theatre Company,pulls you along through the decades with galloping satirical wit as Bartlett’s heat-seeking intelligence locates telling and authentic emotional detail.”

Love, Love Love has yet to be cast, but knowing how much talented actors are attracted to Paul’s ironic and satirical style, it certainly will be replete with branded thespians who are more than prepared to entertain.

Love, Love, Love runs from November 30 through December 13 at the Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, 937 Liberty Avenue, Downtown.

For tickets and more information about Kinetic Theatre Company click here.

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

off the WALL to Hold Benefit for Planned Parenthood

OTW EPR SQExistence, Persistence, Resistance from Off the Wall Productions is a cabaret-style event focusing on honoring the vital contributions women have made in the theater industry, particularly the performers, composers, and lyricists of musical theater.  This celebration of women and their many talents features some of the best musical performers in Pittsburgh.  Cassidy Adkins, Elizabeth Boyke, Cynthia Dougherty, Catherine Gallagher, Natalie Hatcher, Caroline Nicolian, Gena Sims, Monica Stephenson, Katie Trupiano, Sandy Zwier, and organizer Hilary Caldwell have prepared an array of songs written or composed by women, each one near and dear to the heart of the ladies who selected them, and some even come from outside of the musical theater scene.  You will hear tunes made famous by Carole King, Sara Bareilles, Dolly Parton, Fiona Apple, and Mariah Carey.  You might even get to hear pieces from a couple local composers too.  It is an event that is sure to have something for everyone, and truly supports women of all walks of life.

Organizer Hilary Caldwell
Organizer Hilary Caldwell

Even more importantly, the proceeds of the night will go to support Planned Parenthood, one of the most needed health organizations in our country, and also one of the most demonized. The debate over taking away federal funding threatens millions of women, men, and non-binary individuals and their access to not only sex education and affordable birth control, but STI and cancer screenings, gender counseling, and hormone treatment.  As Hilary Caldwell expressed in her statement about the performance, “Planned Parenthood is an organization that changes and enhances the lives of all women – straight, lesbian, bisexual, cis, and trans, of all racial and socio-economic backgrounds – with its medical, educational, and counseling services.  It’s an organization for the people, by the people – what our government is supposed to be.  We need to step up and do the work this administration is evidently unwilling to do, and take care of each other as we battle for our rights.”  If we want to see women’s work in theater continue to proliferate and innovate, we must support our sisters in every aspect of their lives, especially their sexual lives.

EPRHEADSHOTSThe political scene over the past year have been surreal and it is hard to figure out how to stand up for each other, but sometimes the best way of helping is just celebrating our achievements together and finding joy in the midst of struggle.  We resist simply by existing as authentically as we can, and applauding others for doing the same.  Come join these gifted ladies as they exist, persist, and resist.

Click here for tickets. 

 

Artist Spotlight: Tony Sirk

13393943_10103484202307648_5888429201040680467_nIn the theater world it is hard to find someone not vying for the spotlight. Tony Sirk, one of Pittsburgh’s most sought-after costume designers, told me that he hated to talk about himself. Perhaps this kind of reserved attitude is due to of mid-western upbringing in Indiana. Pittsburgh is the biggest town he has ever lived in, but he likes it because of its neighborhood-y feel. It’s not too big.

Tony has a few gigs in Pittsburgh— he is the First Hand at Point Park University, and he is Resident Designer at both Pittsburgh Musical Theater and Pittsburgh Festival Opera.

Looking at his handiwork in person or on his website http://anthonysirk.com/, you would not assume that he only began sewing as an undergrad theater student at Ball State University. Tony attributes some of his skill to genetics. His grandmother and mother both were hobby-seamstresses. Although they never showed him the ropes, he just picked up on sewing when he needed to provide costumes for a student production.

The Drowsy Chaperone at Western Carolina University
The Drowsy Chaperone at Western Carolina University

After leaving Ball State, he bounced around the south between the Creede Repertory Theatre, the Alabama Shakespeare festival and various spots in Florida. He missed winter, and his husband is from West Virginia not too far from Pittsburgh, so moving here was a good fit.

It is the diversity of Pittsburgh’s theater scene that really makes Tony love living here—that and the fact that Pittsburgh supports the arts. Tony noted that no one gets into the theater to get rich. What he loves about costume design is that at the end of the day he has something tangible to show for his hours at work and that he rarely does the same thing twice. Tony approaches his work as a problem solver. In his position at Point Park, he receives a general idea, and then he makes it work. Recently, for the musical Pinkalicious, Tony made four-foot cupcakes out of yoga mats.

Jekyll and Hyde at Pittsburgh Musical Theater
Jekyll and Hyde at Pittsburgh Musical Theater

Working in the academic world at Point Park and freelancing with local theaters has been a blessing for Tony because he gets to work with students, and he gets to go deep into design work. Pittsburgh Theater has been a welcoming scene for him, and at times he even turns down work. His favorite shows to design are shows that have never before been staged. That way he can truly create a vision instead of deriving from another designer’s work. This summer he will be costuming Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s A Gathering of Sons which is an opera examining racial politics surrounding the police shooting of an unarmed black man, and a family’s grief at the loss of their child.

Guys and Dolls at Creede Repertory Theatre
Guys and Dolls at Creede Repertory Theatre

Currently, Tony is working with high school students who are staging a teen-friendly version of the musical Hair as part of their training with Pittsburgh Musical Theater. The kids remind him of why theater is so powerful. He said, “I look at them having fun and I think about the first time I did a show. Those kids enjoy it so much”.

Keep an eye out for what Tony is up to this summer by following along with our reviews of the Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s summer season!

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

Everything Old is New Again – Pittsburgh Festival Opera Coming Soon!

616883292_780x439To celebrate its 40th anniversary, the ambitious Opera Theater of Pittsburgh has rebranded as “Pittsburgh Festival Opera,” and will continue to offer musical innovations and rarities that have been steadily growing in quality over the past few summers. This summer’s performances start June 15, and will run through the greater part of July, so the company’s capacity for work hasn’t diminished, and there is every reason to believe that the quality of its work will equal or surpass what it has offered for a number of years.

“While our main productions take place in an extended summer season,” Jonathan Eaton (the company’s Artistic and General Director) stated in a recent press release, “our commitment to the next generation of both artists and audiences is maintained year-round with our education programs. We are thrilled that audiences and critics support us as a cherished addition to the summer cultural calendar. We continue to produce our mix of new operas, rarely-performed works, and reinvented classics with passion and commitment. We realize that it has come to define our company more and more – so we feel it is now time to change our name to Pittsburgh Festival Opera to better reflect our activities.”

gathering_of_sonsThis season promises all of the above, and begins with the second commissioned work in the company’s “Music that Matters” series of new operas taking on contemporary issues. A Gathering of Sons, outlined in detail by our writer Jacob Spears in February, will start this summer’s productions on June 15. This world-premiere is a new “social justice opera,” composed by Dwayne Fulton, set to a libretto by Tameka Cage Conley, and in music with jazz, gospel and modern classical influences, tells the story of a young black man, a white police officer, parents of a newborn child, and “a collection of spirits who watch over the world.” Several performances will be given “on tour” in a few local venues before its first performance at the Falk Auditorium of Winchester Thurston on July 1. For a closer look at A Gathering of Sons take a look at Nicole Tafe’s article here. 

Stephen Sondheim’s and Hugh Wheeler’s Tony Award winning Sweeney sweeny_toddTodd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street, is this summer’s “musical,” and will receive five performances beginning Friday, July 7, at the Falk Auditorium, running through the month until Saturday, July 22. The popular work is staged by international director Tomé Cousin, conducted by Douglas Levine, and will feature well known local singers, such as Anna Singer (Mrs. Lovett) and Robert Frankenberry (Beadle), with baritone Andrew Cummings in the title role. The production seems sure to provide a little ghoulishly fun musical entertainment.

Since Pittsburgh Opera Festival has for the past couple of summers educated xerxesme to the fact that I genuinely, deeply appreciate the very old operas of Georg Friedrich Händel – something I never knew before – his masterpiece Xerxes on the list this year pleases me greatly. A combination of the comic and romantic, the opera will star Metropolitan Opera counter-tenor Andrey Nemzer as Xerxes, the King Persia. Still more Metropolitan Opera Company influence will be brought to the front in these performances, as the work will be staged by that company’s director, Dan Rigazzi. Three performances will commence on Friday, July 14,  with repetitions on Sunday, July 16, and Saturday, July 22. Walter Morales will conduct the orchestra, augmented by the always magnificent Chatham Baroque ensemble. The cast will also include singers (Lara Lynn McGill, to name but one) who have lent their abundant talent in previous summers.

Richard Strauss’ Intermezzo will be the fourth in the company’s series of rarely-performed works by that German master, and will be directed by Jonathan Eaton, with Brent McMunn conducting. It’s a semi-autobiographicalintermezzo treatment of a troubled marriage; Paul Thomason wrote an interesting history of the real life events which led up to Strauss’ composition of the work, which premiered in Dresden in 1924. It was slow to reach the United States, the first professionally staged performance done by Santa Fe Opera (also in an English translation, as will be Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s) in 1984. It was performed in a concert version at Carnegie Hall in New York in 1986, but was never done in a fully staged version in that city until New York City Opera produced it in 1999. Pittsburgh Opera Festival’s revival of the rarity will mark its premiere in Pennsylvania. It will receive only two performances, at the Falk Auditorium – Friday evening, July 21, and Sunday afternoon, July 23. Eaton and McMunn accomplished wonders with last summer’s The Silent Woman, so there’s every reason to expect the same results this year.

Hansel and Gretel will be this summer’s “family friendly” kiddie opera. Engelbert Humperdinck’s masterpiece (and, yes, there was a famous German hansel_and_gretelcomposer of that name long before the pop singer of the 1960’s), will be heavily cut to 40 minutes of the opera’s best moments, so as not to tax the attention span of its little patrons. In the early decades of the last century, the full, magnificently orchestrated version of the opera was a popular Saturday matinee at the Metropolitan, frequently with the famous Pittsburgh-born contralto Louise Homer in the role of the Witch. The opera will be performed in the more intimate Hilda Willis Room at Winchester Thurston, on Saturday mornings at 11:00, July 1, 8 and 15, with more than reasonable admission prices.

This summer’s Recital Series, Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s tradition of one-night concerts and special musical events, looks particularly appealing, and will include the “Three (Counter) Tenors,” with Metropolitan Opera star Andrey Nemzer, on Friday, June 30, followed by an opening night party. Daphne Alderson will provide the next entertainment, with “Leonard Cohen: A Hallelujah at Love Café,” on Thursday evening, July 13. Next up is “Mozart by Moonlight: a Garden of Operatic Delights,” with two full acts from Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” performed in a moonlit garden, at the Falk Auditorium on Wednesday, July 19. Concluding the series will be “Songs of Richard Strauss,” featuring singers from the Young Professional Artists company on Saturday, July 22. All of the events, with the exception of “Mozart by Moonlight,” will take place at the First Unitarian Church, Shadyside.

Other features of this summer’s doings will be a “Discover Strauss Series,” and “If I Loved You,” a new “dramatic revue of star-spangled songs by Rodgers and Hammerstein” performed around the July 4 holiday weekend at Snuggery Farm in Sewickley Heights, and at the Falk Auditorium July 9 and 16. There will also be cabarets, opening night parties and other attractions, as usual.

For full details of Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s busy summer, tickets, more detailed information on special events and much more, please visit their new and colorful website. This ambitious, capable company is quite a summer musical treat, so drink up as much of it as you can! You won’t be disappointed.

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

Pittsburgh’s Polished Musical Theatre Gem: The CLO

cloThe Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera, as the CLO is officially known, has been around for a long time. Its first performances were outdoors at Pitt Stadium in June of 1946. Back then it was a summer stock theatre company that provided lighthearted entertainment to the Steel City, as America regrouped after World War II. Edgar J. Kauffman, of Pittsburgh’s department store and Falling Water fame, helped provide the initial financing to launch the CLO.

Imagine for a moment performers, singing and dancing outdoors in a football stadium in the days before modern sound and lighting systems. Actors back then really had to belt out a song in order to be heard by the crowd.

You might have heard that the former Civic Arena was built not just for a hockey team, but to also be the home of the CLO with a retractable roof- “theater under the stars”. In 1973 the CLO moved to the former Penn Theatre, now known Heinz Hall and later moved to The Benedum Center in 1988.

Most Pittsburghers still think of the CLO as a summer musical theatre. It has grown to be so much more. In addition to the six show main stage season, the CLO Cabaret features a year round smorgasbord of smaller musicals and cabaret performances in an intimate club setting. The less obvious part of the CLO’s work is training actors and creative teams in musical theatre through the CLO academy and Mini-Stars. The CLO founded the Gene Kelley Awards for high school musicals in our region and the National High School Musical Awards.

As the CLO’s reputation for high caliber and high quality productions has grown, demand for its productions has expanded nationally, resulting in a half dozen national tours being launched.

Perhaps the biggest change, while still being true to its Pittsburgh mission has been in the development of musicals on Broadway that include Legally Blonde, Curtains, Monty Python’s Spamalot, The Color Purple, Chita Rivera: The Dancer’s Life, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Bombay Dreams, Flower Drum Song and Big River.

This leads us to the current year’s big story, An American in Paris, which it created in partnership with Elephant Eye Theatricals and Theatre du Chalet. It opened in Paris, played on Broadway and now the national tour is here in Pittsburgh. The show is a testament to CLO’s very successful transition from a summer stock company to full fledged Broadway Producer with roots firmly planted in Pittsburgh and an ongoing commitment to world-class theatre.

First, a brief stop over at the CLO Cabaret at Theatre Square.abby

Mix together the work of Doctor Ruth and Emily Post and you get Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating and Marriage. The relationship expert to the stars!   Kick back and relax as Miss Abigail imparts the expertise she developed before booty calls and speed dating ruled – before the divorce rate was 50% and when ‘fidelity’ was more than an investment firm!

paigePaige Davis plays Miss Abigail.  She is most recognized from the TLC series Trading Spaces, but her true love is theatre and dance. Paige was one of the featured actresses who played Roxie Hart in Chicago on Broadway and in an odd twist of fate with the theatre next door here played God in An Act of God. Pittsburgh audiences have seen her in the national tours of Sweet Charity and Beauty and the Beast and as Maria in the Sound of Music. Great to have her in town for more than a week!

Miss Abigail’s Guide To Dating, Mating and Marriage performs May 11th to August 13th at the CLO CABARET in Theatre Square

The CLO Summer Season; A Well Oiled Machine

Presenting six full staged musicals with Broadway worthy orchestra accompaniment in two and a half months would be a challenge for any producing organization. The CLO has refined their process for making art and theatre magic over the past seventy seasons and has transformed it into a well-oiled machine. As you will see, a lot is about connections, great people, and good tools coupled with superior Stage Management skills, organization and scheduling.

As has been the case the past several years, the CLO has opened its season in alignment with the PNC Broadway series season closing production. This is a national tour production for which the Pittsburgh CLO has invested in with shared producing credit. The second show is usually from another regional theatre company. This effectively gives our CLO a month long head start before the final four home grown productions hit the boards at the Benedum.

I spoke with the CLO’s Producing Director, Mark Fleischer, about what it takes to pull off the season that appears to be seamless and effortless.

First and most importantly, “We get the best people we can” in order to “make memorable theatre that really special for the audiences”

The CLO nurtures new talent. Fleischer indicates in many cases “it is their first shot” at launching their professional theater career. Many actors subsequently return to the CLO to “give back and enjoy the comradery and creative energy that comes from an eight-day rehearsal cycle”.  Yes, you read it right, there are only eight days from first rehearsal typically starting on Thursday morning to opening night the following Friday at eight. And yet, these are fully realized productions that include rich choreography, full sets, lighting, costumes and orchestra.

To make it all work, creative team members with familiarity and past experience with the specific musical is a plus.  It also helps if the lead actors have played the role previously. Directors and Choreographers with similar or assistant experience or those who just know the CLO drill and can work well at the breakneck pace contribute significantly to the successful execution of the season.

A strong and versatile ensemble of singers and dancers works at rehearsing the upcoming show simultaneously in multiple physical spaces while squeezing in time for costumes fittings. Many ensemble members are rehearsing next week’s show during the day and performing that night.

The sets are a combination of build, buy or rent. The CLO Construction Center builds for CLO and other theatres and rents its inventory to other companies as well.

A strong Stage Management team coordinates everyone and everything, making it all happen like clockwork. The leads, ensemble, Directors, Choreographers, Designers, crafts persons, union stagehands and the musicians all pull together to make it “the best production possible”.

As Fleisher says, of the CLO “We Make Art, We Don’t Import It”

Here is a look at the 2017 CLO Summer Season

parisTheatre people refer to performers who can act, sing and dance, all equally and extraordinary well, as triple threats. The musical An American in Paris possesses those qualities and so much more, including the music of George and Ira Gershwin. This show was the most award-winning musical of the 2015-16 Broadway Season! It is also the hottest ticket in Pittsburgh this summer.

At the end of World War II, Jerry Mulligan, an American soldier, decides to stay in Paris and nurture his passion for painting. With a little help from kindred soul seekers Adam Hochberg, a composer and fellow veteran; and Henri Baurel, the son of wealthy French industrialists and wannabe song and dance man, they imagine a bright future in the City of Lights. Then Jerry meets and falls head over heels for a stunning French ballerina named Lise Dassin. The problem is Henri is about ready to propose to her.

An American in Paris has the perfect combination of a compelling story, beautiful dance routines, and the magic and romance of Paris and the unforgettable songs from George and Ira Gershwin.

McGee Maddox, who plays Jerry, took over the role in April, previously he was a principal with the National Ballet of Canada. He is first and foremost a dancer and that becomes quite apparent as the show progresses.  Classically trained ballerina Sara Esty is Lise. She has been the alternate for Lise at the Paris premiere and on Broadway prior to assuming the role full-time on the national tour.

Acclaimed director/choreographer and 2015 Tony Award®-winner Christopher Wheeldon received a Tony® Award nomination for Best Director and won the Tony Award for Best Choreography for this production. Christopher has danced for the Royal Ballet and New York City Ballet.

If you love dance, Gershwin music, and fabulous staging, An American in Paris is the must see show this summer.

An American in Paris, presented in cooperation with PNC Broadway Across at the Benedum Center with performances May 30th to June 11th

mermaidWould you give up your voice to live somewhere else and perhaps find love? The beautiful young mermaid Ariel longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. It is based on one of Hans Christian Andersen’s most beloved stories that was adapted by playwright Doug Wright. The story focuses on Ariel’s longing not for her prince, but for “a world in which she feels truly realized in her own terms” per Wright.  The music is composed by eight-time Academy Award winner Alan Menken and includes the classics “Under the Sea,” “Kiss the Girl,” “Part of Your World” and more!

Checkout how the designers transform the Benedum to Ariel’s underwater world, no scuba gear required!

Disney’s The Little Mermaid is produced by Pittsburgh CLO and Kansas City Starlight with performances June 14 to June 25 at the Benedum Center.

heightsIn The Heights is a great opportunity to catch Lin-Manuel Miranda’s work before he created Hamilton. Miranda wrote the initial script for In The Heights in 1999 while he was in his sophomore year in college. He nurtured and morphed the show and brought it to its to its Broadway premiere in 2008.  The Director & Choreographer for the CLO’s production is Michael Balderraman. There is a nice Miranda connection as Balderraman is currently the resident Choreographer for the Chicago production of Hamilton. This is a great chance for us to see Balderrama’s interpretation of Miranda’s first revolutionary musical.

Story wise; In the Heights weaves Latin rhythms, hip-hop and pop to tell the story of a neighborhood in change and the challenges of chasing the American dream as you cling to your roots and those you love.

Summer is the perfect time to see In The Heights and imagine the hot steamy summer days in Washington Heights, a largely Latin-American neighborhood in New York City. Unforgettable songs, scorching rhythms and passionate choreography make for an exciting show.

In The Heights Performances July 07th to 16th at the Benedum Center

newsThe second Disney musical of the summer is based on the real-life Newsboy Strike of 1899, Newsies is the story of Jack Kelly, a rebellious newsboy who rallies “newsies” from across NYC to strike for what’s right after publishing giant Joseph Pulitzer threatens their livelihood.

Richard J. Hinds is directing at Pittsburgh CLO for the first time. His Broadway credits include the Tony nominated Come From Away as Associate Choreographer and Disney’s Newsies as Associate Director. He will also be choreographing this production.

Newsies was the winner of the Tony® Awards for Best Score and Best Choreography. Critics rave about the energetic and pounding choreography of the Broadway production. Let’s see if Hinds and the CLO troupe are up to the challenge.

As with most Disney shows, the music is charming; one of composer Alan Menken trademarks.  James Cunningham joins Pittsburgh CLO for the first time as Music Director for this and the remainder of the season.

Disney’s NEWSIES is at the Benedum Center July 18th to 23rd

mammaFor pure fun nothing beats Mama Mia! the wildly popular juke box musical loved by millions of people around the globe.

There’s not a lot of heavy lifting here plot wise. On the eve of her wedding, a daughter’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men back to the island they last visited 20 years ago, much to the chagrin of her mother.

The musical is a fun Abba immersion including such hits as “Super Trouper”, “Dancing Queen”, “Take a Chance on Me”, “Thank You for the Music”, “Money, Money, Money”, “The Winner Takes It All”, “SOS” and the title song.

Barry Ivan returns to the CLO as the Director & Choreographer for Mama Mia. His previous CLO directing assignments include Elton John & Tim Rice’s AIDA, The Wedding Singer, Sunset Boulevard, Company, A Little Night Music, Footloose, The Full Monty, Miss Saigon, West Side Story, Smokey Joe’s Cafe and Les Misérables.

Mama Mia! is at the Benedum Center,  July 28th to August 06th

millioinOn December 4, 1956, rock ‘n’ roll icons Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins converged on Sun Records in Memphis for a jam session that became known as Million Dollar Quartet. Thankfully, Sun’s owner, Sam Phillips, pressed the record button and rock ‘n’ roll history was made. Million Dollar Quartet takes you behind the music with 21 legendary hits that define rock ‘n’ roll, including: “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Walk the Line,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Hound Dog.” The four of them never sang together again.

David Ruttura, who is currently the Associate/Resident Director of Broadway’s School of Rock directs this production. Ruttura has worked on Broadway, off-Broadway, regionally and internationally.

Million Dollar Quartet plays at the Benedum Center August 8th to 13th

Pittsburgh CLO season, three show and single tickets are on sale now and may be purchased by calling 412-281-2822 or BY visiting pittsburghCLO.org/buy-tickets 

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

Split Stage Wraps a Successful Third Season, Announces an Ambitious Fourth

Split Stage Productions, co-owned by Westmoreland County’s Rob Jessup and Nate Newell just wrapped up a successful third season of three shows; Spring Awakening, Carrie and Cabaret.

Rob and Nate saw untapped potential for an innovative addition to the community theater circuit in Westmoreland County and founded Split Stage just over two years ago.

Spring Awakening brought Director Barbara Burgess-Lefebvre, Choreographer Aaron Cook and Music Director Ben Bedenbaugh to The Theater Factory in Trafford; both a new creative team and a new theatre for Split Stages. Carrie was staged at the Apple Hill Playhouse, a creepy old barn just perfect for a Halloween show. The season closed with Cabaret, it was their first full musical at the newly restored Lamp Theatre in Irwin.

Rob credits the willingness of these new locations for “Welcoming Split Stages with open arms. From holding dates to opening both front doors to the community and back doors to the theater’s resources.  We couldn’t ask for better venue partners.”

I asked about the challenge of keeping your loyal audience while moving to different theaters in different towns.  “What might have caused some push back from regulars turned to a surprising upside along with new audience members welcoming an edgier than usual fare at their neighborhood theater. They became Split Stage followers from show to show.“

Split Stage’s mission is to bring to the Westmoreland County area quality, high caliber theatre with top-notch production values to an ever-expanding audience. Rob and Nate’s long-term goal is to produce works that continue and grow upon that tradition.

Toward that end, they have just had their “not for profit status” confirmed and obtained their IRS 501c3 certification yet still keeping one foot planted on the edge and the other firmly on the commercial side.

Season three carries on the tradition, but grows the season to four productions. Here is what’s on tap:

chicagoFirst up is a production of the original 1976 version of Chicago produced in association with Westmoreland event producer Kelley Simon, it plays at the Palace Theatre in Greensburg June 2nd and 3rd. Jim Mikula directs, Laura Wurzell choreographs and Eric Barchiesi is Music Director. Mandie Russak (seen in Cabaret as the MC) plays Roxie Hart and Victoria Ashley (from Spring Awakening) is Velma Kelley.

side showSide Show plays October 6th to 14th at the Apple Hill Playhouse in Delmont. Rob envisions that the side show experience begins as soon as you park your car. There will be jugglers, knife throwers, and other surprises. Side Show is a musical by Bill Russell (book and lyrics) and Henry Krieger (music) based on the lives of Daisy and Violet Hilton, conjoined twins who became famous stage performers in the 1930s. Side Show is slated to be directed by Jim Scriven.

that time of yearThat Time of Year is this year’s holiday show playing December 15th to 17th at the Lamp Theatre in Irwin. It’s not a sappy Christmas musical, but a more realistic depiction of the holiday season. Jim Scribin directs this musical revue of 25 all-original Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year’s songs run the musical gamut from show tunes to rock, blues and jazz

last 5 yearsThe season closes with the musical The Last Five Years. It plays at the intimate Theatre Factory stage in Trafford January 26th through February 3rd.

This is an emotionally powerful and intimate musical about two New Yorkers. Jamie and Cathy are both in their twenties and fall in and out of love over the course of five years. The show uses reverse storytelling; Cathy, is a struggling actress, who tells her story in reverse while Jamie, a rising novelist, reveals his story chronologically from when they first met.  The two characters play opposite of each other and are only together on stage once, at their wedding, in the middle of the timeline.

Split Stage co-owners Rob Jessup and Nate Newell present an ambitious fourth season for focused on bringing top-notch theatre to the Westmoreland County area. Season three’s selections are diverse and engaging. Consider taking in a show or two brought to you by a talented group of theatre folk.

For tickets and more information about what Split Stage Productioins has to offer, click here. 

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

Throughline Theatre: Heading to New Places

The Fair SexIt’s shaping up to be an innovative year for Throughline Theatre Company. After producing four shows a year at the Grey Box Theatre for the last five years, they’ve had to find a new space. Michael McBurney, Throughline’s Public Relations Director, says the company is excited about being in a new space. They will be performing their shows this year at the Henry Heymann Theatre in Oakland. Due to the space switch, they will only be performing two mainstage shows this season, but there will be a third show with a fun new format!

Throughline’s theme for this season is “The Fair Sex,” which follows up their 2016 theme of “Can You Trust the Government?” When asked if current events have been inspiring their recent themes, McBurney says they’ve definitely been taking the cultural environment into consideration. This year, theatre goers can expect to see shows about gender, sex, and equality. And while there will be comedy throughout each show, the underlying message will be easy to spot.

Both mainstage shows will run over two weeks on a Friday/Saturday then Thursday/Friday/Saturday schedule. Each Saturday will have a matinee performance as well as an evening one. The first Saturday of each show will be a “pay what you can” day for those who are tight on money. Throughline is also working on new ways to engage groups related to the theme. “We’re trying to branch out for what Throughline can offer to folks,” McBurney says. If you have a group that would be interested in working with Throughline on a special evening or group engagement, you can email him at mcburney@throughlinetheatre.org.

Vibrator PlayIn the Next Room (Or the Vibrator Play) by Sarah Ruhl

Set in the 19th century, this show tells the story of a family who is struggling with intimacy, as was the case for many families in the era. The husband, a doctor, has created a wonderful new invention that runs on electricity and can cure women of “hysteria.” The play provides heartfelt moments as well as spotlighting the lives of several women who are affected by this new machine.

In the Next Room will be directed by Abigail Liz-Perlis, who also directed the company’s acclaimed version of Everyman a few years ago. The show will run June 16-24, and there will be a talkback on Friday, June 23rd, immediately following the show.

Cloud 9 ImageCloud 9 by Caryl Churchill

This is a story of sexual exploration, social and racial roles in society, and soap opera-esque flip-flopping of relationships. The play is set in British colonial Africa for the first act and London for the second. Twenty-five years pass between the acts, and the actors all play different roles in the second act. It’s a highly amusing tale of men and women and their scandalous exploits, and ultimately about accepting people as they are.

Cloud 9 will be directed by Edwin Lee Gibson, who is a new member of Throughline’s board. The show will run August 11-19.

Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare

For the third show of Throughline’s season, they’ll be delivering an exciting one night only live-read podcast recording of Shakespeare’s classic comedy. This well known show about love and deceit will be read by Throughline actors for a live audience as it’s recorded to be released as a podcast.  This event will be happening at the Glitter Box Theatre sometime in September, so stay tuned to Throughline’s social media outlets for news about this event!

For more information about Throughline and what they’re up to, check out their website here

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here. 

Reacquainting Ourselves with Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh (MTAP)

17309516_1245988655455569_2654319705563916058_nTheatre and the continued vitality of the dramaturgical community thrive upon collaborative spaces, dynamic connections, and open spaces—imagined or real. The rapidly popularizing phenomenon of incubator spaces, a phenomenon considered to be the cornerstone of modernization in a variety of different professional and creative realms, is integral to this development and maintenance of dynamic, theatrical communities. Capitalizing on this trend is the Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh (MTAP), an incubator that operates as a creative, collective space in which individuals and troupes with symphonic visions or musicals already in motion to rehearse and present their pieces.

The heart of MTAP’s mission harkens back to the grassroots of theater, particularly musical theater, that depended upon shared space, multitudinous voices and visions, and a profound sense of community. MTAP’s core mission is one that is built upon the idea of fostering collaboration. With a membership impressively numbering over eighty individuals, MTAP has a remarkable group of members from a variety of backgrounds—be it seasoned professionals with extensive academic and performance experience, to schoolteachers and writers with a unique take on the creative process. Additionally, many of MTAP’s members have storied backgrounds in writing and performance, specifically from Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh Universities. As such, there is a strong current of community devotion and drive to cultivate an eclectic, open and prosperous microcosmic musical community that is specifically Pittsburgh-centric. Not only does the community-centered structure of MTAP–which features weekly meetings, collaborative rehearsal times, and open forums including all members—encourage a robust and vigorous performance environment, but it allows for artists with preconceived ideas to be challenged and preset conventions of performance and musicality to be deconstructed through unique interactions with other artists in an incubator space. Executive director and creative producer Stephanie Riso, a CMU alum who played a key role in founding two Pittsburgh creative outlets—PICT and Cabaret Pittsburgh—brings twenty years of expansive experience in musical theater (including stints as a lyricist in New York City’s illustrious musical theater scene) and a specific goal of lifting up and providing a financial backbone to the many artists who flock to MTAP.

An outstandingly compelling sub-sect of MTAP is the scintillatingly titled Hot Metal Musicals, which will undergo a tremendous revival after dormancy since 2015. In 2015, artists were called upon to partake in a plethora of diverse and stupendous musicals including Me, Myself and Others (written and composed by Pittsburgh favorite Eva Rainforth), Lazarus (created by well-known visual artist and creative visionary Chuck Sperry)  and [best imitation] (by Jeremy Richter). The shows were designed to invite individuals to perform but also to provide their own input and directive notions. In anticipation of the exciting return of Hot Metal Musicals this summer, I was privileged enough to view a staged read-through of The Storm, a musical adaptation by Stephanie Riso derived from Alexander Ostrovsky’s play. The musical focused on the dire conditions of peasants near the banks of the Volga River, the burgeoning contempt due to egregious class disparity, and unexpected amorousness that buds in the midst of conflict. The staging was replete with exceptional vocal performances, and indicated a passionate and thrilling season ahead for Hot Metal Musicals and the performers affiliated with the company.

MTAP’s membership policy and encouragement of submissions and collaboration signal a phenomenal shift in Pittsburgh theatre—one that diversifies and strengthens the tapestry of community performance, simultaneously supporting creative identity and group interactions.

For more information about MTAP, what they’re up to and how to become a member,  click here. 

We would love to hear from our readers and follow along with your theater adventures so keep in touch with us on our FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR.

And don’t forget to sign up for our email blasts here.