Features

Lights Out Gathering Conjures Memories and a Few Ghosts at the Playhouse

By: Yvonne Hudson
20180618_214333Kiss the day goodbye… When theatre practitioners gather there are stories to be told. When Point Park University invited former performing arts students and friends to the venerable Pittsburgh Playhouse for a final party on two stages, the event was a sell out. It was a sentimental and vibrant evening--warm hugs and cold drinks on a hot spring night--full of memories, conversations with old friends from past shows and classes, and chances to “be remembered” by writing on surfaces soon to disappear. Think class reunion meets cast party. Gotta have a gimmick... [caption id="attachment_7301" align="alignright" width="225"]The back wall and fly space in the Rauh Theatre The back wall and fly space in the Rauh Theatre[/caption] As a PPU alumna who initially interacted with Playhouse artists as a student journalist, I returned as an observer, recalling many theater and dance performances that shaped my own professional steps. I was a journalism undergrad who often interview artists, reviewed productions, and publicized the legendary Playhouse Jr. as an intern. On this night, I was again observer, visiting some areas of the building for the first time. So this final glance represents just some of my last impressions of the grand old dame of Pittsburgh theatre, the Playhouse. Old friend... During the evening, guests found fellow cast members, faculty, and fans among the estimated three hundred visitors who were given access to all corners of the performance center. Whether enjoying refreshments or drinks on both the Rauh and Rockwell Theatre stages or exploring the lower dressing rooms or side scene shop spaces, those who made the memories for decades of audience members were making new memories in familiar places. [caption id="attachment_7304" align="aligncenter" width="656"]Emily Leech Bell and back wall of the Rockwell Theatre Emily Leech Bell and back wall of the Rockwell Theatre[/caption] I wanna be a producer... Alums were able to sign and leave message on the back wall of the Rockwell stage, on a giant poster board of the building, and find their former monikers on the walls of the Rauh stage. Every corner of the spaces evoked memories for--as seems to be the tradition in theatre life--not much is discard but forever reused, recycled or used to document the experiences of performances that are passing fancies until the next show. Show People... I found old friends Lisa Delmar and Steven Wilson, both PPU Class of 1996, catching up on Rockwell stage. A longtime New Yorker, Lisa hadn’t been to the theatre since she was on the stage in Into the Woods in 1994--and she had brought a show photo for old times sake, pictured below. IMG_1865Steven last directed Our Lady of 121st Street at the Playhouse in 2015 and has just moved back to Pittsburgh. He recalled spending time from age 11 when he attended many theater programs for young people through his college career at Point Park. Wayne Brinda, artistic director of Prime Stage Theatre, and Steven reunited in one of the countless “What have you been doing?” conversations that could be heard all over the building. Another openin’, another show… In the Studio Theatre, a slideshow recounted years of productions through the requisite photos documenting every production. For universities, video is limited, due to production rights, so these “frozen in time” stills become the record for many students’ performance, design, and production management work as they enter the arts community following graduation. Now you might find some of them sprinkled as memories in artists’ Facebook pages, but at Lights Out, these memories were in the spotlight. Come and meet those dancing feet... IMG_1875I asked the woman sharing my table about an intriguing pair of shoes mounted on the wall high above the side stage entryway. We had both taken a photo of them but knew nothing about their history. But it was the Playhouse Jr. we had in common. Emily Leech Bell is the daughter of the program’s founder Bill Leech. He as the manager for whom I did PR during college. Emily was attending more on behalf of her sister Alice Leech, a theatre alumna in California and in memory of her late father. I recalled seeing Alice in Wait Until Dark during college. God bless us every one... Jim Critchfield, an alumnus whose character roles are well-known in the region, reunited with Audra Blazer which whom he was on stage when she was Tiny Tim to his first Scrooge in town. When a thing is wick... Every nook and cranny--from the box office to the green room--was full of something you can’t quite put a finger on, but the joy, sorrow, and resonance of art making was palpable that night. Richard Rauh, whose name has long honored his family’s support of the Playhouse, garnered several standing ovations. Before final bows, Ron Lindblom is the most recent in a long line of PPU administrators and artistic directors who have cared for curriculum, productions and facilities during the 83 year run of the Playhouse. At the evening’s end he reminded the full house in the Rockwell how aptly the place was located at the corner of Craft and Hamlet in Oakland. Now it’s place that will live on in memory and tradition at PPU’s new Pittsburgh Playhouse downtown. [caption id="attachment_7302" align="aligncenter" width="656"]Ken Gargao and Richard Rauh Ken Gargao and Richard Rauh[/caption] What I did for love... Everyone joined those on stage singing “What I did for Love” in the Rockwell. Then the stage manager appropriately made the last call, lights down and lights...out. Ghostlight. Carrying souvenirs with them and even more memories into the steamy night, everyone knew they were leaving a bit of themselves behind but taking even more with them for spending just a few more hours...on stage at the Pittsburgh Playhouse. And I am telling you I’m not going... And what I take with me? A green Playhouse holiday ornament, some teary tissues, and a reminder that were it not for the Pittsburgh Playhouse and my editor at PPU’s Globe, I probably wouldn’t be writing this story for you now. Follow me… Follow the new Pittsburgh Playhouse and its autumn 2018 opening production Cabaret here and at pittsburghplayhouse.com.. For more on the original Pittsburgh Playhouse and the theatre history that preceded its purchase by Point Park, visit background on Wikipedia, a reminder of how the theatre was a forerunner to the city’s cultural district and more contemporary venues. For context of the Playhouse’s role in Pittsburgh theater, look for Lynne Connor’s Pittsburgh in Stages where many other long-gone venues are documented. So, come hear the music play...

The Short Order Play Fest

By: George Hoover
sopfDesigned as a showcase for playwrights, directors and actors of the “over forty” set, The Silver Theater Project continues its Spring Salon Play Reading Series at The Glitter Box Theater with THE SHORT ORDER PLAY FEST on June 9th and 10th. The program featured seven short plays, each around fifteen minutes in length. Seven plays by six authors using four directors yields a mixed bag of results. Some were funny, some sad and some thought provoking. The short plays in order of presentation are: Troll (Writer F.J. Hartland, Director Barb Sawatis) features Thomas Smith in a one man show / stand-up comic routine about a gay man from the outskirts of Altoona, PA, who moves to the “Magic Kingdom of Pittsburgh” in search of happiness and love. Savage Lands (Writer Timothy Ruppert, Director Barb Sawatis) Jenine Pierce and Charlotte Sonne play two English sisters, the older who lives in London, the younger in Schenectady, NY. They rekindle their mutual affection through the exchange of letters in the 1740s. Random Muffin (Writer Tammy Ryan, Director Barbra Burgess-Lefebvre) features Ryan’s husband Jack Lefebvre and on Saturday night, the director herself, as a last-minute stand-in. On the way to visit her daughter at the hospital, an anxious woman rushes into the hospital looking for paper towels to clean brown smears from presumptively chocolate muffins off her car. She seeks solace in the cafeteria where she encounters an exhausted radiologist. A Blanket of Stars (Writer F.J. Hartland, Director Patricia Fuchel) Charlotte Sonne and Rebecca Herron play women in their late 70s who walk into the park to view the lunar eclipse and discuss life’s lessons learned now that they are older, wiser and wider. This Damned Life (Writer Eileen Quigley, Director Michael McGovern) Randy Burner plays Dracula, Thomas Fuchel is Renfield and Jane Scuteri-Tinker is the backstage “Jill-of-all-trades” in this comedy. The master of the night and his able assistant take up residence in a dark and dank community theatre where Dracula winds up with the lead in the production of Doll’s House and Renfield becomes the Stage Manager. Theatre jokes abound in this spoof of backstage life. Hugger Muggers (Writer & Director Michael McGovern) read by Darlene Fedele Thompson, Thomas Fuchel and the uncredited Suzanne Levinson.  Under the supervision of a blue bird, a couple tries to decide what they want in life as they up their game. [caption id="attachment_7196" align="aligncenter" width="656"]Lucia Metrailler as The Lady In White / William S. White as John Johns / Mary Chess Randolph as Weeping Eleanor / Marylee Casey as Red Meanie / Harry Gerhardt as Gorgeous George in Samantha A. Camp's Entrances and Exits The ghosts in Entrances and Exits[/caption] Entrances and Exits (Writer Samantha A. Camp, Director Michael McGovern) Harry Gerhardt, William S. White, Mary Chess Randolph, Lucia Metrailler and Marylee Casey play five ghosts of the Pittsburgh Playhouse who face the destruction of their world while they debate the benefits of sugar v.s. the pink stuff. As these are readings with scripts still in hand our focus becomes more on words and less on acting, direction and staging. With that in mind our favorites are the poignant Trolls, the heartwarming turn-about between the two sisters in Savage Lands, the oddly quirky Random Muffin and the inside jokes in This Damned Life. Kudos also to Randy Berner and Thomas Fuchel as a very funny Dracula and Renfield and the two sisters from Savage Lands, Jenine Pierce and Charlotte Sonne. Silver Theater Project founder Michael McGovern is on to something here. It’s early in the projects evolution, resources are tight and relatively inexpensive performance spaces are hard to come by.  (Although one with a working air conditioner would be an improvement for the actors and audience.) I can see Silver Theater Salon Readings happening in a big mansion on Fifth Avenue. Dream on….  The Short Order Play Festival concludes its run on Sunday, June 10th. Check out Silver Theater’s next offerings Filter, No Filter by Kim El coming in October and Vivienne by Timothy Ruppert in December.

Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s 2018 Season Kicks Off July 6th

By: George B. Parous
PFO HeaderThe local “Intimate Opera Theater,” Pittsburgh Festival Opera, will begin its summer offerings the evening of Friday, July 6, at the Falk Auditorium of Winchester Thurston in Shadyside. For three weeks, the company will offer an eclectic assortment of staged productions, one-off concerts, and recitals, cabarets, opening night parties and other events. The first week will fill the weekend with performances, while the second two weeks will extend from Wednesdays through Sundays. La Bohème WarholaThe festival begins with La Bohème Warhola – a “re-imagined” version of Puccini’s standard in which the action is moved to the 1960’s New York art scene. Daniel Schlosberg has arranged the work and will conduct the orchestration that was co-commissioned with Heartbeat Opera, New York. Louisa Proske will direct, and the cast will include Jonathan Tetelman (Rudolph); Jessica Sandidge (Mimì); Joshua Jeremiah (Marcel); Nicolette Mavroleon (Musetta); Joel Balzun (Schaunard), Matthew Scollin (Colline), and others, singing in an English translation by Amanda Holden. The first performance begins at 7:30 p.m., Friday, July 6, at the Falk Auditorium, preceded at 6:30 by an Art Exhibit Opening and followed at 10:30 by an opening night party, both in the Cabaret Lounge space at Falk. All of the remaining performances will take place at the same venue – Sunday, July 8 at 2:00 p.m. - and Thursday, July 12; Saturday, July 14 and Thursday July 19 – all at 7:30 p.m. Bernstein on BroadwayAnother feature of the opening weekend will be the first performance of Bernstein on Broadway, a celebration of American composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein’s centenary. Music Director Robert Frankenberry has arranged a one-hour program of excerpts from Bernstein’s musicals to be performed by members of the company’s Young Professional Artists, and the first presentation will take place on Sunday, July 8, at 8:00 p.m. in the Snuggery Farm in Sewickley Heights. A separately ticketed “Gourmet Barbecue” will precede the performance at 6:00 p.m., and all repetitions of the program will take place in the Hilda Willis Room at Winchester Thurston – Goldie B. Locks and the Three Singing BearsWednesday, July 11, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, July 14, at 10:30 p.m., and Saturday July 21, at 10:30 p.m. The Hilda Willis Room will also be the venue of all performances of this summer’s “kiddie” opera, Goldie B. Locks and the Three Singing Bears. Using music by Mozart and Offenbach, John Davies has created and adapted this contemporary take on the beloved fairy tale, which runs just 40 minutes. Performances will be Saturday matinees at 11:00 a.m. on July 6, 14 and 21. RhinegoldThe highlight of the second week will be the return of Richard Wagner’s Rhinegold (Das Rheingold), in composer Jonathan Dove’s condensed, English-language version, first presented when the company was known as Opera Theater of Pittsburgh, in July 2005. At that time, none of the four music-dramas of Wagner’s epic Der Ring des Nibelungen saga had been heard locally since 1930 – and Das Rheingold, considered the prelude to the works which follow, had not been heard since Pittsburgh’s first and only complete, fully staged “Ring Cycle” in 1923. This one act prelude, loaded with gods, goddesses, mermaids, giants, and gnomes, is, for the most part, the exchange of sung dialogue between the many characters, with just a few spots of what could be considered sustained singing – perhaps the most famous and impressive of these being the warning Erda, the primeval earth goddess, addresses to Wotan, ruler of the ancient Norse gods. With reduced orchestration and sung in Andrew Porter’s English translation, Rhinegold runs for two hours – meaning approximately forty minutes of Wagner’s music is omitted, to give an idea of the size of these colossal works which unravel the downfall of the mythical gods. It is undeservedly the least appreciated of the “Ring” music-dramas, and abounds with some of Wagner’s most majestic orchestration. Conducted by Walter Morales and directed by Jonathan Eaton, the Rhinegold cast includes Kenneth Shaw as  Wotan; Robert Frankenberry as Loge, the god of fire; Barrington Lee as Alberich, the Nibelung dwarf; Mary Phillips as Fricka, wife of Wotan and the goddess of marriage and morality; Demareus Cooper as Erda, the all-knowing “Earth Mother”; Adam Cioffari and Andrew Potter as Fasolt and Fafner, the giants who built Valhalla; Alexander Boyd as Donner, the god of thunder; Brooke Dircks as Freia, the goddess of youth, beauty and feminine love, and Hanna Brammer Dillon, Emily Hopkins and Kathleen Shelton as the three Rhine Maidens, guardians of the “Rhine Gold.” Three performances will be given at the Falk Auditorium – Friday, July 13 at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, July 15 at 2:00 p.m., and Saturday, July 21 at 7:30 p.m. ArabellaWeek three will once again bring a Richard Strauss rarity - Arabella, the last opera Strauss created in collaboration with librettist Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Set in Vienna in the 1860’s, the action revolves around a Shrove Tuesday Carnival, and the romantic comedy of mistaken identities and the secret love letters so often found in opera. Matthew Scollin will take the part of the aging Count who can afford to launch just one of his two daughters, Arabella (Melinda Whittington), into “society.” Brent McMunn will conduct and Dorothy Danner will direct the cast in John Gutman’s English translation, and the vocal talent will also include Katie Manukyan (Zdenka); Danielle Wright (Adelaide); Andrew Cummings (Mandryka); Mark Tempesta (Matteo); Robert Chafin, Rob McGinness and Adam Cioffari as the Counts Elemer, Dominik, and Lamoral, among others in the large ensemble. Standing out in the concert offerings of this summer, Jane Eaglen in recital, billed as “A Wagnerian Idyll,” will be heard at the First Unitarian Church at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday evening, July 7. From 1996 to 2004, the English-born soprano appeared in over fifty Metropolitan Opera performances - as Donna Anna in Don Giovanni, the title roles in Bellini’s Norma and Puccini’s Turandot, all three Brünnhildes in Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen saga, and most notably as Isolde with Ben Heppner in Tristan und Isolde. In this repertory and other roles, she has performed in Seattle, Barcelona, Chicago, San Francisco, Milan, London, Vienna, Los Angeles, Munich, Bologna and elsewhere. Her extensive work on the concert stage is equally impressive, including guest soloist appearances with Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Zubin Mehta and the New York Philharmonic, and with Claudio Abbado at the Salzburg and Edinburgh Festivals, to name but a few. Ms. Eaglen will also serve as artistic director of the Mastersingers Project for Young Dramatic Voices, which will perform semi-staged scenes from Richard Wagner’s music-dramas at the First Unitarian Church on Saturday July 14, at 8:00 p.m. Other concerts, lectures, and events will round out the month. For a full performance calendar, detailed production information, tickets and more, please visit Pittsburgh Festival Opera.

PNME Theatre of Music – Ensemble to Perform Weekends in July for the 43rd Consecutive Year

By: George B. Parous
PNME_HeaderPittsburgh New Music Ensemble (PNME) is a group of top-notch musicians that has been making July Friday and Saturday nights compelling musical experiences since 1976, and the work they have done over the years includes the premieres of over 300 specially commissioned new compositions. The dedicated energy of this group that gathers each summer from near and far is palpable at every performance, and such a wide variety of styles is offered that practically all musical tastes are accommodated. It wouldn’t be accurate to state they simply offer concerts of new music – the pieces performed are augmented by creative artistic and lighting effects that make them “musical experiences” which draw in the listener in a manner that is innovative and highly entertaining. As the group’s Mission states: “The PNME Theatre of Music seeks to bring together the people and the arts of our time. Using music as the vehicle for larger ideas, we commission, perform, and present new work, constantly reinventing the concert experience in a relentless pursuit to bring meaningful experiences to our audience.” Catherine Noe’Rourke, Executive Director, and Kevin Noe, Artistic Director of PNME, recently took the time to share some thoughts on the upcoming performances and the ensemble in general. [caption id="attachment_7143" align="alignleft" width="264"]Kevin Noe, Artistic Director Kevin Noe, Artistic Director[/caption] “PNME’s 43rd year promises to be one for the memory books! I’m thrilled with the range of emotions, the artistic languages, and all the various artistic media featured this summer,” Mr. Noe began. “With music, visual art, poetry, shadow puppetry, and animation, the varying inspirations and subjects are both wide ranging and universal. Whether it’s the kind of special first time listening that happens only when new world premieres are launched, or the immersive ‘Theatre of Music’ experience, PNME offers something compelling, moving, and memorable for everyone this season. “With five world premiere commissions in the first two weeks alone by composers David Biedenbender, legendary jazz bassist and composer Rufus Reid, Korean composer JungYoon Wie, Cuban composer Ivette Herryman, and composer and guitarist D. J. Sparr, we begin our July 2018 season with topics ranging from the tragedy of infertility to the need for remembrance, from the five stages of grief to a genre-bending tribute to Bernstein, Gillespie, and Monk, and all the way to the goofy but poignant remarks of children around the dinner table. Born of a collaboration between Pittsburgh visual artists Linda Price-Sneddon and Val M. Cox, week two is embroidered and deepened by a rich visual artscape commission only possible at PNME. Week three we feature our often imitated but never duplicated Lindsay Kesselman in a show designed to stretch you in every direction until you feel whole again. Week four sees the return of our highly acclaimed show The Gray Cat and the Flounder as we prepare to launch it on an international tour in the summer of 2019.” [caption id="attachment_7142" align="alignright" width="271"]Catherine Noe'Rourke, Executive Director Catherine Noe'Rourke, Executive Director[/caption] “Above all things, PNME is on a relentless pursuit to bring meaningful experiences to our audience,” Catherine Noe’Rourke added, “ - to release them back to their lives with a new  brilliant prism through which they see things a bit differently. "The PNME audience is an enthusiastic bunch - hungry for art, shared unique experiences, and to be a part of our lime green community,” she said in conclusion, referencing the group’s “team color.” This season’s offerings are, in Week One - featuring the 2017 winners of the American Composers Forum annual competition - (Friday, July 6 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, July 7 at 8 p.m.) Week OneProgram - From Across the Table (David Biedenbender); Remembrance (Rufus Reid) and Every Bone Has a Memory (Jung Yoon Wie). Week Two (Friday, July 13 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, July 14 at 8 p.m.) - Week TwoProgram - Nullipara (D. J. Sparr, composer; Caitlin Vincent, librettist) and Memorial (Ivette Herryman). Week Three (Friday, July 20 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, July 21 at 8 p.m.) – Week ThreeProgram - PNME soprano Lindsay Kesselman in music by David Lang, Amy Beth Kirsten, William Bolcom, Lee Kesselman, John Bucchino, Jeff Nytch, and Kieren MacMillan. Week Four (Friday, July 27 at 8 p.m., Saturday, July 28 at 8 p.m. – AND a Special Family Matinee Performance, Saturday, July 28 at 1 p.m., FREE for Kids and special price for adults!) - Week FourProgram - The Gray Cat and the Flounder (Kieren MacMillan, composer; Kevin Noe, Co-Creator). Gray Cat KidsAll performances are given at City Theatre, and are a great way to begin or end a Friday or Saturday summer night in Pittsburgh’s colorful South Side neighborhood. The evening performances are followed by fun "BYO Bottle of Wine" (or drink of choice) meet-and-greet type gatherings in the lobby, with “nibbles” (and wine glasses) provided by a different team member each evening. PNME’s website is one the best designed there is to be had, full of audio clips, detailed program information, great photography and graphics, history and more. It’s a “must see.” For a vivid taste of what the ensemble has to offer – and tickets – visit  PNME Theatre of Music.

Summer Preview 2018

By: Mara E. Nadolski
Summer LogoA Letter from the Editor, Here we are again, on the cusp of Summer. This will be Pittsburgh in the Round's 5th Summer season here in the Steel City so we truly want to thank you, our precious readers, for sticking it out with us all this time! Pittsburgh's theatre community grows bigger and bigger every season and so do we! Right now we're looking to expand our team with new reviewers as well as a newly created position, the Advertising Sales Representative! If you have a sales background or if you love to write and love theatre then email us at info@pghintheround.com! We'd love to hear from you! May has been our biggest month yet and it's not even over! If you're planning on skipping that trip to the beach, why not take in a few shows? Buckle up, because this summer we're hitting our usual festivals with the addition of a few new ones! We will check in with our old friends like the Pittsburgh CLO, and new friends like FolkLab. Perhaps maybe we'll even start a new feature series or two! We would love to hear more from our readers so follow along with all of our theater adventures on FacebookTwitter, or Instagram using the hashtag #SummerwithPITR. To stay up to date on everything we’re getting into, click here to join our email list! Weekly updates straight to your inbox every Thursday. Summer's almost here! Mara E. Nadolski Editor in Chief, Pittsburgh in the Round
Let’s start off with the Top 5 shows we’re looking forward to most this summer. 20729091_1851626854854336_4239272439321839532_o#5 - Ragtime by the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center - As we complete our first year of reviews of LPPAC, (with our first, of hopefully many, high school interns) we come to the  1998 Tony-nominated show Ragtime. This 20 piece orchestra and 54 person cast will feature a few Pittsburgh favorites like Daina Michelle Griffith and Tru Verret-Fleming alongside current and former students of the Center. Ragtime features characters from all walks of life and backgrounds that weave together stories of what it truly means to be an American at the turn of the century. Ragtime opens at the Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center in Midland, PA June 15. For tickets and more information click here. sfb#4 - Stupid Fucking Bird by 12 Peers Theater - If you know your Chekhov then you already know what this 2013 play is about. Playwright Aaron Posner brings The Seagull into current times with self-aware characters, political references, and modern language. Throw in a few love triangles, some fourth wall breaking and maybe even a little audience participation and you've got a show where everyone grows up a little and learns how life can sometimes just be disappointing. Stupid Fucking Bird runs at the Richard E. Rauh Studio Theatre at the University of Pittsburgh starting July 26. For tickets and more information, click here. 33083916_2282788798614634_8402550434505424896_n#3 - The Short Order Play Festival by the Silver Theater Project - The Silver Theater Project was created by local playwright Michael McGovern in 2017.  The company sets out to give voices to the underrepresented playwrights, and characters, over the age of 40. This festival will include plays by local favorites like Tammy Ryan, FJ Hartland, and McGovern himself. Along with their weekend of short plays, they'll be having a mini-fundraiser that starts before their first night of shows! The fundraiser and following short plays will start at 7 pm on June 9 and continue on June 10 at the Glitterbox Theatre! For tickets and more information click here. Screenshot (38)#2 - A Streetcar Named Desire by Little Lake Theatre - In one of Tennessee Williams' greatest plays, we follow southern belle Blanche DuBois as she travels to New Orleans to live with her sister Stella and her husband Stanley after a few questionable events in her small hometown in Mississippi. Blanche and Stanley do not get along and their increasing friction leads to Blanche's breaking point. This all happens in Little Lake's quaint in-the-round space in Canonsburg. A Street Car Named Desire opens July 12, for tickets and more information click here. 31949897_10156286789960797_1620844297286844416_n#1 - James and the Giant Peach by Cup-A-Jo Productions - One of Roald Dahl's most beloved stories will be adapted for the Glitterbox stage in a peculiar new way. The story of the orphan boy James escaping the clutches of his evil aunts to go on an accidental adventure to New York City will get a bit of a twist and a makeover by the Cup-A-Jo team. While adaptation will include original music and an ensemble cast, Founder Joanna Lowe stresses that this is not necessarily Children's Theatre per se, but is still appropriate for all ages. James and the Giant Peach runs weekends at the Giltterbox starting June 22! For tickets and more information, click here. If these  5 aren't enough for you, check out our 5 Musicals You Don't Want to Miss This Summer: 2018! Want more musicals? Check out our season previews of the Pittsburgh CLO and Split Stage Productions! Helen's been spending time with a group of actors at Aftershock Theatre lately. You might have read Part 1 of her feature about them and here's Part 2 for you! Some of our favorite Shakespeare happens in unexpected places. If you're like us, check out our preview of the Steel City Shakespeare Center's upcoming production of As You Like It. In the midst of the hype surrounding the triumphant return of Marc Masterson to City Theatre, don't forget to check out their season finale: the Momentum Festival. We've made some new friends at the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble! We've got some great information on their 43rd season here.  And in case you missed it, here are a few highlights of what we've been up to this Spring! The Diary of Anne Frank by Prime Stage Theater Picasso at the Lapin Agile by Throughline Theatre Company Heathers the Musical by Comtra Theatre Rusalka by Resonance Works|Pittsburgh Hir by barebones productions Dogfight by Stage 62 King Headley II by Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company Social Security at the Apple Hill Playhouse Recoil by the University of Pittsburgh Stages Jane Eyre by PICT Classic Theatre A Bright Room Called Day by CMU Drama Equus by the Duquesne University Red Masquers Milo de Venus by Non-State Actors Byhalia, Mississippi by off the WALL Productions The Grand Duke by the Pittsburgh Savoyards The Little Mermaid by Pittsburgh Musical Theater Inside Passage by Quantum Theatre In House by Corningworks Moby-Dick by the Pittsburgh Opera Heisenberg by the Pittsburgh Public Theater Rushing Horizons by Texture Contemporary Ballet

Fifteen Years of Momentum

By: Eva Phillips
31714767_10155319989472127_9090695184206790656_nAs the denouement of City Theatre’s exhilarating and compelling season swiftly approaches, the illustrious Pittsburgh theatre annually elects to end things with a proverbial bang, keeping the electric pace of the theatre racing onward. Fittingly, the unique festival that ties up City’s season is Momentum—now in its fifteenth year—an impressively whirlwind collaborative festival that combines both workshopping and production of new plays. City Theatre’s Director of New Play Development Clare Drobot spoke with me about this year’s Momentum Festival and the stupendous plays on the horizon for this year. Momentum Festival, which was pioneered by City Theatre’s former Artistic Director Tracy Brigden (whose respective run with the company lasted sixteen years) was created to and continues to generate and nurture an environment in which the national and local conversations and dramaturgical efforts can intersect, coexist, and dynamically generate a swath of new plays in a remarkable short amount of time. Though the duration of the festival is somewhat brief (running May 31st-June 3rd), the creative planning and logistical work for the festival is a season-long endeavor. Both Drobot and City Theatre’s Artistic Producer Reginald Douglas are responsible for curating the programming and writers, actors and other individuals that will be involved in the festival. The ideas of community and lasting relationships are tantamount to Momentum’s success and continuation, and Drobot emphasized that much of the preliminary planning and development for Momentum centers around seeking out individuals and projects that will “foster long-term artistic relationships.” A key aspect of the mission to uphold community and relationships is the follow-up world premiere or second full production that one of the plays featured at Momentum will enjoy. 2018 Momentum play The Burdens will be the recipient of the second run at City Theatre after the festival’s premiere. This year’s Momentum Festival features four electric plays that range drastically in content and style, both illuminating Momentum’s commitment to diversity (of participants and creative vision) and outstandingly open and adaptable ethos. The plays—P.Y.G. or the Mis-Edumacation of Dorian Belle (by Terrance Arvelle Chisholm); The Burdens (by Matt Schatz); #F*ck7thGrade (by Jill Sobule); and The Haunted (by Claire Kiechel)—encompass a breadth of topics and theatrical tricks, from audience interactions with Taboo buzzers to a skype-live performance, that will surely enthrall audiences and participants alike. Drobot highlighted the not-at-all insignificant effort—which, crucially, is a team effort for everyone at City, from tech to actors to exuberant front of house staff—that is involved in the break-neck pace of Momentum, with rehearsals commencing the day before the festival and the entire production/staging process transpiring in a matter of hours and days. In addition to the expert precision and tremendous work put forth by City Theatre’s team and the team of actors, writers, production crews etc., Drobot noted that this year’s Momentum is particularly special as City Theatre will join forces with Dramatists Guild Foundation and the Dramatists Guild. As part of the festival, DGF Fellow Eric Micha Holmes (whose plays include Nimpsey Pink and Jackets in May) will serve as City’s writer in residence and be directly involved with In Their Own Voices, a partnership effort that brings thirteen Pittsburgh playwrights to center stage, that is co-hosted by the Guild’s representative Gab Cody. What is fundamentally important to Momentum’s prosperity and growth, Drobot reiterated, is the mission of letting new works come to life and find their audience. Much of what makes Momentum phenomenally unique is City’s adherence to using Pittsburgh-based casts and crews, which allows for the projection of the robust Pittsburgh dramatic community onto a national scale and in a national dramaturgical dialogue. Moreover, the festival provides a unique, incredibly fast-paced creative fulcrum for creative relationships, like the workshopping of Sean Daniel’s The White Chip, that led to the working relationship between Daniel and director Daina Michelle Griffith to Daniel Krell and the eventual production in City Theatre’s main season. Momentum not only is a chance for individuals to witness incredible new shows and talents, but it also illuminates the amazing energy and ceaseless creative work happening constantly within the Pittsburgh theatre community. As Drobot astutely stated, City Theatre being an instrumental player in the creation of the dramaturgical cannon is “the epitome of success.” Anyone seeking to be entertained while catching a glimpse of the enormous potential that characterizes Pittsburgh theatre and City Theatre would be remiss to not take part in 2018 Momentum Festival. For more information about City Theatre and the Momentum Festival click here. 
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Summer: 2018
By: George Hoover
Split Stage Announces Fifth Season
By: George Hoover
Catch a Great Musical this Summer at the Pittsburgh CLO’s 72nd Season
By: George Hoover
The 2018 Gene Kelly Awards!
By: George Hoover
Steel City Shakespeare Center: Breaking Down Barriers
By: Tiffany Raymond
Ted Takes a Bow
By: George Hoover
Orphans – A Passion for Process, Part II
By: Helen Meade
Orphans – A Passion for Process, Part I
By: Helen Meade
Resonance Works to Present the Pittsburgh Premiere of Dvořák’s “Rusalka”
By: George B. Parous
Step into 1963 with Stage 62’s Dogfight
By: Megan Grabowski
Pittsburgh CLO Ignites a SPARK to Pierce the Dark
By: Brian Pope
Pittsburgh Opera’s Season To Close with “The Elixir of Love”
By: George B. Parous
Five Fringe Shows, So Many Flights of Stairs
By: Alex Walsh
Three Bearded Dudes and That One Girl: Fringe Day 3
By: Tiffany Raymond
Fringe Festival in Three Shows
By: Ringa Sunn
Fringe Day 3: St. Mary’s Lyceum: Part 2
By: Megan Grabowski
Fringe Day 3: St. Mary’s Lyceum: Part 1
By: Megan Grabowski
Ballet, Puppets, Memories, and Marxism: Fringe Day 3
By: Cayleigh Boniger
A Fringe Bookend
By: Carson Singer
No Matter Where You Go, There You Are – Fringe Day 2
By: Helen Meade
An Evening at St. Mary’s – Fringe 2018
By: Alex Walsh
I am Feeling a Fringe Ocean (metaphor) Against My Body
By: Carson Singer
Day Two of Fringe 2018
By: Megan Grabowski
Fringe 2018: A Day of One Person Shows
By: Tiffany Raymond
It Sounded Like Shakespeare Hypnotized Children of Heaven in My Dreams
By: Helen Meade
What Do Tentacles, Judy Blume, and Anxiety Have in Common?
By: Carson Singer
Puppets, Proletarians, Things That Go Pop, and Police Violence
By: Alex Walsh
First Friday of Fringe!
By: Megan Grabowski
Gala Round Up 2018
By: Eva Phillips
Pittsburgh Shakespeare in the Parks’ Week of Will Preview
By: Ringa Sunn
“Moby-Dick” Coming to Pittsburgh Opera
By: George B. Parous
Spring Preview 2018
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Front Porch Theatricals Finds Universal Truths in Two True Story Musicals
By: Brian Pope
Inclusion and the Unknown: Pittsburgh Fringe Festival 2018
By: Mark Skalski
Igniting Creativity with CLO’s SPARK Festival
By: George Hoover
Little Lake’s 70th Anniversary Season!
By: Tiffany Raymond
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Spring: 2018
By: George Hoover
Quantum Makes Way for the Next World Premiere: Inside Passage
By: Yvonne Hudson
Pittsburgh Public Theater’s 2018-2019 Season!
By: George Hoover
Eric Ferring on Pittsburgh Opera’s “Ashes & Snow”
By: George B. Parous
Pittsburgh Opera Announces 80th Season’s Line-Up
By: George B. Parous
Pittsburgh Opera’s Benjamin Taylor Takes “The Long Walk”
By: George B. Parous
Winter Preview 2017
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Weirdo Extraordinaires Find Homes at the Glitterbox
By: Eva Phillips
5 Christmas Shows To Put On Your Nice List This Holiday Season
By: Brian Pope
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Winter 2017
By: George Hoover
Aftershock Theatre: Bringing Relevant Works to Lawrenceville
By: Meredith Rigsby
Danielle Pastin – Homegrown “Countess” to Grace Pittsburgh Opera’s “The Marriage of Figaro”
By: George B. Parous
Corset Up and Remember to Breathe
By: Lucy Franklin
PICT Teaches Romeo and Juliet Lessons in the Neighborhood
By: Yvonne Hudson
off the WALL Opens 2017-2018 Season with I Won’t Be in on Monday
By: Eva Phillips
Pittsburgh Savoyards Celebrate 80th Season!
By: Robyne Parrish
Bricolage Presents Its Latest Immersive Experience: DODO
By: Meredith Rigsby
12 Peers Presents Pittsburgh Plays in First Installment of Mythburgh
By: Tiffany Raymond
Everything Old Is New Again: The Silver Theater Project
By: George Hoover
Real/Time Interventions Presents Angelmakers: Songs for Female Serial Killers
By: Nichole Faina
Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company Represents In Its New Season
By: Brian Pope
PNWF – New Works from Around the World: Part 3
By: George Hoover
Fall Preview 2017
By: Mara E. Nadolski
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Fall: 2017 Edition
By: George Hoover
There’s No Place Like City Theatre’s 2017-2018 Season
By: Brian Pope
Artist Spotlight: Rachel M. Stevens
By: Yvonne Hudson
A Space to Subvert: The New Hazlett Theater’s Community Supported Art Fall Season
By: Mark Skalski
Historic Labor Conflict Comes to Life in New Battle of Homestead Play At The Pump House
By: Yvonne Hudson
Ted Pappas’ Grand Finale at PPT
By: Yvonne Hudson
Pittsburgh Opera – 79th Season Preview
By: George B. Parous
Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center Dreams Bigger
By: Emily Koscinski
PSIP Continues Its Mission to Offer Fun, Accessible Theatre with Henry V
By: Robyne Parrish
PNWF – New Works from Around the World: Part 2
By: George Hoover
Collegiate Preview 2017
By: Mara E. Nadolski
CMU Drama Pulls Out All the Stops this 2017-2018 Season
By: Robyne Parrish
Carlow University Presents Alumni Show This Fall
By: Ringa Sunn
Duquesne Red Masquers’ Ambitious 105th Season
By: George Hoover
Finding New Solutions in Old Problems: Pitt Stages’ Upcoming Season
By: Mark Skalski
Point Park Gets to Work on Another Eight Shows at the Pittsburgh Playhouse
By: Brian Pope
PNWF – New Works from Around the World: Part 1
By: George Hoover
Show Tune Saturday Night
By: George Hoover
Hot Metal Musicals 2017
By: George Hoover
The Triumphant Return of Hot Metal Musicals
By: Eva Phillips
“If I Loved You…” – Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s New Revue
By: George B. Parous
PITR’s Top 5 Picks for Summer 2017
By: Jack Lake
Summer Preview 2017
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Love, Ethics, and Religion: Kinetic Theatre’s Season Lineup
By: Stephen Arch
off the WALL to Hold Benefit for Planned Parenthood
By: Cayleigh Boniger
Artist Spotlight: Tony Sirk
By: Nichole Faina
Pittsburgh’s Polished Musical Theatre Gem: The CLO
By: George Hoover
Everything Old is New Again – Pittsburgh Festival Opera Coming Soon!
By: George B. Parous
Split Stage Wraps a Successful Third Season, Announces an Ambitious Fourth
By: George Hoover
Throughline Theatre: Heading to New Places
By: Ringa Sunn
Reacquainting Ourselves with Musical Theatre Artists of Pittsburgh (MTAP)
By: Eva Phillips
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Summer: 2017 Edition
By: George Hoover
Music that Matters – A Gathering of Sons, Pittsburgh Festival Opera’s World Premiere
By: Nicole Tafe
Artist Spotlight: Quinn Patrick Shannon
By: Brian Pope
Little Lake Prepares for a Paramount 69th Season!
By: Nicole Tafe
Paying Attention to Miller’s Masterwork at PPT
By: Yvonne Hudson
Sensations and Emotions: Fringe Day 3
By: Eva Phillips
Trump and Circumstance: A Politically Charged Day 2 at Fringe
By: Eva Phillips
That’s a Wrap: Fringe Day 3
By: Alex Walsh
Unpredictable Treasure: The Fringe Fest Day 3
By: Mark Skalski
Apocalypse, Adventure, Sex, and Bingo: A Fringe Odyssey
By: Mark Skalski
Into the Fray: First Night of Fringe
By: Eva Phillips
Fringe-Worthy Entertainment
By: Brian Pope
Sunday Fringe: Taking a Dive into the Absurd
By: Nichole Faina
Bring It Around Town: Fringe Sunday
By: Cayleigh Boniger
Jed Allen Harris is at Home with Quantum for Collaborators
By: Yvonne Hudson
Solos Going Steady at the Fringe
By: Alex Walsh
First Time Fringer Saturday!
By: Victor C. Leroi
Tips and Tricks at Saturday’s Fringe
By: Nichole Faina
No April Foolin’ at the Fringe
By: Cayleigh Boniger
An Apocalyptic Tour of Fringe 2017
By: Jason Clearfield
Fringe Culture
By: Brian Pope
Fringe 2017 Day 1: Teeth & Sinew and The Chronic Single’s Handbook
By: Nichole Faina
Friday Fringe at AIR!
By: Megan Grabowski
The Fringe Awakens
By: Alex Walsh
First Time Fringer Friday
By: Victor C. Leroi
Gemini Children’s Theater – Making Magic for Young Audiences
By: Yvonne Hudson
Bricolage Production Company’s 12th Annual BUS!
By: Jason Clearfield
Artist Spotlight: Billy Hepfinger
By: Ringa Sunn
Cup-A-Jo Productions’ Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf: Inviting Audiences Into Their Home
By: Stephen Arch
Spring Preview 2017
By: Mara E. Nadolski
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Spring
By: George Hoover
The New In The Mythical: 12 Peers Theater’s Latest Season To Seek Unity In Discord
By: Mark Skalski
Stage 62 Goes to Camelot, Neverland, and More!
By: Meredith Rigsby
Fourth Annual Pittsburgh Fringe Festival!
By: Eva Phillips
Pittsburgh Festival Opera Raises Community Voices in Upcoming Production
By: Jacob Spears
Theater Galas and Fundraisers in Pittsburgh this Spring
By: Claire Juozitis
Artist Spotlight – Brian Vu on “As One”
By: George B. Parous
Artist Spotlight: Jeffrey Chips
By: Nichole Faina
Artist Spotlight: Leah de Gruyl as “Richard the Lionheart”
By: George B. Parous
Winter Preview 2016
By: Mara E. Nadolski
5 Holiday Shows You Don’t Want to Miss
By: Claire Juozitis
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Winter
By: George Hoover
Jumping Jack Theater Provides Interactive Opportunity for Special Needs Audiences
By: Meredith Rigsby
Artist Spotlight: Sean Sears
By: Nichole Faina
Loosening the Screws of Performance with Unbolted
By: Eva Phillips
Building an Organism, Part 2: The Space Upstairs
By: Jason Clearfield
Building An Organism, Part 1: slowdanger
By: Jason Clearfield
Pittsburgh’s Must-See Halloween Shows
By: Jack Lake
A Peek into the Pittsburgh Actor’s Space
By: Eva Phillips
Season 42 at City Theatre Brings Even More New Plays!
By: Isaac Crow
New Hazlett’s Community Supported Art Series Begins Third Season
By: Victor C. Leroi
Pittsburgh Savoyards Serve up Three Favorites in 79th Season
By: Yvonne Hudson
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Fall
By: George Hoover
Community, Celebration, and Risk Taking: McKeesport Little Theater’s Fall Season
By: Mark Skalski
Pittsburgh Opera’s 78th Season Opens October 8 with Verdi’s “La Traviata”
By: George B. Parous
Twenty Years of Prime Stage
By: Nichole Faina
Fall Preview 2016
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Dancing into Fall 2016
By: Chloe Kinnahan
A New Day for PICT Classic Theatre at the Union Project
By: Yvonne Hudson
Fun with Shakespeare in the Parks!
By: Mara E. Nadolski
PNWF Returns for 26th Annual Showcase
By: Megan Grabowski
Pittsburgh Playhouse Brings Dramaturgical Powerhouse Season
By: Eva Phillips
CMU Drama to Engage and Challenge in 2016-2017 Season
By: Drew Praskovich
Collegiate Preview 2016
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Student-Run Red Masquers to Push Boundaries in Upcoming Season
By: Mark Skalski
Pitt Stages Creates New and Familiar Realities in Resilient Spaces
By: Yvonne Hudson
Can We Interest You in a Musical About Lust, Love, War, Race and Class?
By: George Hoover
Ubu the King Hits Pittsburgh, One Night Only!
By: Jack Lake
Memories of OTP’s “SummerFest” 2016
By: George B. Parous
Artist Spotlight: Connor McCanlus
By: Jack Lake
Dimitrie Lazich and “The Silent Woman”
By: George B. Parous
Local Company to Hold Shakespeare Event in Support of Orlando’s Pulse Nightclub
By: Jason Clearfield
Momentum 2016: New Plays at Different Stages
By: Drew Praskovich
off the WALL’s Season of Pittsburgh Premieres
By: Chloe Kinnahan
Summer Preview 2016
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Much to Be Expected from Throughline This Season
By: Roxy Lillard
Another Round of 10 Minute Plays!
By: Yvonne Hudson
A Quarter Century of Quantum
By: Yvonne Hudson
Artist Spotlight: Tracy Brigden
By: Nichole Faina
Little Lake Theatre: Flourishing in 2016
By: Victor C. Leroi
The 12th Annual Theatre Festival in Black and White
By: Jason Clearfield
“SummerFest” Is In the Air!
By: George B. Parous
5 Musicals You Don’t Want to Miss This Summer
By: Drake Ma
PICT Conjures Poe’s Terror for Final Bows at Pitt before next Season at Union Project
By: Yvonne Hudson
One Stop Shopping: The Pittsburgh Fringe Festival Coverage 2016
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Fringe Day 3: A Day at St. Mary’s
By: Nichole Faina
Fringe Day 2: A Day Full of Female Playwrights
By: Nichole Faina
A Word or Two from Pittsburgh Opera’s General Director, Christopher Hahn, on “The Rake’s Progress.”
By: George B. Parous
Fringe Day 1: Storytelling and Eulogies
By: Nichole Faina
Fringe Day 3: Four Voices One Story, It’s Who You Know, and Always B Sharp
By: Drake Ma
Fringe Day 3: Funerals, Poetry, Dance and an Open Mic
By: Chloe Kinnahan
Fairytales, Fights, and Failure: Fringe Day 3
By: Jack Lake
Losing Our Heads Over Shakespeare, Part 2: Pittsburgh Shakespeareans Admit Lifelong Attraction
By: Yvonne Hudson
Friday Fringe Binge: Day 1 of the Festival
By: Jack Lake
Fringe Day 2: Beautiful Cadavers, LA Acting Coaches, and Cinderella Stories
By: Chloe Kinnahan
Fringe Day 3: Critters!
By: Megan Grabowski
Fringe Day 2: Ukrainian Dance to One Man Shows to #BlackLivesMatter
By: Megan Grabowski
Fringe Day 2: The Last Lifeboat and A Dream of Midsummer
By: Drake Ma
Fringe Day 1: Passing Through and 5 Hams Fairy Tales
By: Megan Grabowski
Local Theatre Group to Represent Pittsburgh in Edinburgh Fringe Festival
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Losing Our Heads Over Shakespeare, Part 1: Mrs. Shakespeare’s Four-Century Journey
By: Yvonne Hudson
Pittsburgh Fringe Festival Returns to the Northside
By: Nichole Faina
Book of Will: Celebrate the First Folio
By: Yvonne Hudson
“And Suddenly You Know…”
By: Nichole Faina
B.U.S. 11 Provides Laughs, Thoughtfulness and an Anthology!
By: Jack Lake
Strindberg Inspired Play to Premiere at Pittsburgh Playwrights
By: Yvonne Hudson
What’s to Come for SWAN Day 2016
By: Nichole Faina
What to Expect in Season 5 from 12 Peers Theater
By: Jack Lake
Joniece Abbott-Pratt on Strong Female Roles, Pittsburgh Debut
By: Natalie Spanner
Artist Spotlight: Karla Boos
By: Natalie Spanner
Artist Spotlight: Joanna Lowe
By: Natalie Spanner
Pittsburgh Public’s New Season Has It All!
By: Drake Ma
Artist Spotlight: Kim Brown
By: Natalie Spanner
Artist Spotlight: Sabrina Hykes-Davis
By: Natalie Spanner
Tales with Tunes
By: Isaac Crow
Artist Spotlight: Leon Zionts
By: Natalie Spanner
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Blast from the Past
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Artist Spotlight: Clare Drobot
By: Natalie Spanner
Pittsburgh New Works Festival Celebrates 25 years
By: Jack Lake
Artist Spotlight: Matt Henderson
By: Natalie Spanner
Artist Spotlight: Connor Bahr
By: Natalie Spanner
Artist Spotlight: Virginia Wall Gruenert
By: Natalie Spanner
Coming Soon: Artist Spotlight
By: Natalie Spanner
Opera Theater of Pittsburgh’s “SummerFest” Opens July 10
By: George B. Parous
Fringe Sunday AKA The Lost Reviews
By: Corey Hawk
Fringe Day 3: My Day at City of Asylum and the Mystery of the Tall Old Man Solved
By: Jack Lake
Fringe Day 2: Murder, Raw Woman and Bears, Oh My!
By: Jack Lake
Last but Not Least: Fringe Day 3
By: John Nau
Religion, Murder and 9/11: Fringe Day 2
By: Corey Hawk
Fringe Festival Rocks the Northside Friday Night
By: Corey Hawk
Fringe Day Two Coming to You!
By: John Nau
Eerie Hotels and Spooky Taverns: Fringe Recap Day 2
By: Chloe Detrick
Horror Movies and Puppets!
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Fringe Day 1: Don’t Get Robbed, Don’t Be Late!
By: Jack Lake
Fringe Festival Brings Laughs and Music
By: John Nau
Here We Go Again!
By: Mara E. Nadolski
A Week of Will
By: Tyler Plosia
UnCommon Shakespeare
By: Jack Lake
Theater (and Dance and Music and Film and Painting) at SWAN Day 2015
By: Tyler Plosia
SWAN Day Pittsburgh 2015: One Show, Sixty Women and Tons of Talent
By: Sarah Beth Martin
Quantum Theatre’s Q Ball Dazzles Once Again!
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Hot Metal Musicals Delivered on Talent and Variety
By: Isaac Crow
New Musicals to be Showcased at the Cabaret
By: Isaac Crow
The Fringe is No Joke
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Seven Shows in Shadyside: Adventures in Fringe
By: Mara E. Nadolski
From the Internet to the Stage
By: Isaac Crow
And the Winner Is…
By: Mara E. Nadolski
In case you didn’t know…
By: Justin Sines
Until Next Year…
By: Justin Sines
TPS Report – April 28, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
TPS Report – April 21, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
TPS Report – April 14, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
TPS Report – April 7, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
TPS Report – March 31, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
TPS Report – March 24, 2014
By: Mara E. Nadolski
SWAN DAY Pittsburgh 2014
By: Justin Sines
Quantum Gets Qed Up For Q Ball
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Fringe Festival Kicks Off at 5801
By: Isaac Crow
Coming for 2014… TPS Reports!
By: Mara E. Nadolski