Reviews

The Little Mermaid

By: Eva Phillips
37959518_1858271380885852_3210483226216759296_o As someone who was reared in the golden era of Disney, I stand out as one of the anomalies who has never seen The Little Mermaid. Part of this exclusion from the canon was my mother’s renouncing of any narrative that she perceived as outrightly endorsing a “princess/woman desperately seeking” message. But the primary contributing factor to my never going under the sea, as it were, was my visceral fear and hysterical outbursts as a child that would occur whenever someone would try to make me watch Mermaid and Ursula would appear on the screen. I could never get past it to have a meaningful viewing experience (or as significant of a viewing experience as a four-year-old can have). Lo and behold, though, in Comtra Theatre’s recent production of The Little Mermaid, Ursula—played with ravishingly, sneering glee by Clay Glenny—not only stole the show but managed to enrapture me completely. Which is not to say the entire cast didn’t shimmer and shine with beautiful incandescence like one of Ariel’s pilfered nautical treasures. This is perhaps an aggressively trite sentiment to open with, but the cast of The Little Mermaid, as a multitalented, multifaceted ensemble, is above and beyond one of the most charming and effervescent group of actors I have watched in quite some time. Every player—from the spellbinding duo of Victoria Buchtan as Ariel and Naomi Costanza as Flounder; to the hilariously charismatic Ryan Wagner as Scuttle—is resplendent with their own charm and dynamic group energy. More often than not, there is a noticeable dichotomy in the performance style when a cast takes on a venerated/beloved children’s classic—the performances are either abundantly “eager-beaver,” being a bit too cheeky and too over-the-top; or dulled to oblivion, besotted with a sort of begrudging “let’s do the kids show” air. The cast of Mermaid, however, is so incomparably delightful, imbuing each song and exchange with the perfect level of gleeful pomp and raw talent. No cast has been more ebullient, more flawless in their vocal performances and energetic stage presences. Their collective and individual performances, and the utterly enthralled and deeply connected reactions from the audience that they evoked were reminders that not only is there space for whimsical, blissful musicals and adaptations in today’s theatre, but there is a distinct joy in partaking in a superbly and authentically acted piece of theatre. Mermaid, which adheres very religiously to the source material, is an overwhelmingly accessible and enjoyable production, except for the structural problems that arise with the stage limitations at Comtra. While the “in the round” style that Comtra strives for with the space they have to work with is wonderful conceptually, the structure of the space often disallows members of the audience to see certain players in a given scene and the full breadth of the action on stage. However, despite this, the stage production and costume work on Mermaid overcompensates for the limits of the space, and the bombastic elements of wardrobe and design are almost characters in and of themselves. The Little Mermaid is a marvelously delightful instance of pure fun at the theatre that should not be missed. The cast and crew effortlessly adapt and perfects the original in such a way that leaves the audience feeling overjoyed and pleasantly impressed. I am thrilled my terror at Mermaid was officially drowned with this lively remake. The Little Mermaid runs at Comtra Theatre in Cranberry through August 19. For tickets and more information, click here.

Mama Won’t Fly

By: George Hoover
38539022_10155526859021976_2584020005091803136_oApple Hill Playhouse’s latest production, Mama Won't Fly, opened to a full house of loyal followers on Thursday. (The show had its world premiere at Stage Right in 2011.) Written by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope, Jamie Wooten, the show is basically a long-form version of the “classic” TV sketch comedy as done on The Carol Burnett Show or In Living Color. Outrageous situations, bad jokes, and over the top physical comedy held together by quick pacing can make for a hilarious and entertaining show. Mama Won't Fly is the story of a daughter, Savannah Sprunt Fairchild Honeycutt (Dr. Lisa Bompiani-Smith), who agrees to drive her mother, Norleen (Pam Eyler), across the country from Alabama to California to attend her brother’s wedding because her mother announces “she won’t fly.” After much debate, Norleen agrees to head cross-country in Mama's vintage sedan, but not before Hayley Quinn (Katy Grant), the effervescent, over-eager bride-to-be arrives unannounced. Hayley is convinced that traveling together to her wedding is the perfect way to bond with her soon to be in-laws. In Mama Won’t Fly, anything that can go wrong does. There are encounters at an underwear museum, stolen vehicles, crafty cops, community theatre barflies, lost loves, and a “murder” at a family reunion. The show is rich in bad jokes, to the point they seem to pop up for no reason. Did the three writers each bring their copy of the literary classic Uncle John’s Bathroom Humor to their writing sessions? The conclusion, however, will surprise you with a satisfying ending to an otherwise rough and bumpy ride. In addition to the three main characters, four actors: Craig Soich, Mike Crosby, Susan Szymanowski Shirley (who also Stage Manages), and Pamela Lee, cover the seventeen characters the ladies meet in those humorous situations as they travel across America.  Crosby’s over the top portrayal of Officer Dugger and the drag queen/showgirl/minister along with Lee’s drunken English lassie at the bar provide refreshing moments to this longish journey. Director Chelsea Fredrickson is credited in the program for “stepping in at the last minute to save the show.” Judging from the reaction of most of the audience throughout the performance, she succeeded.  The production does have its moments, particularly the performances of Crosby and Lee. Despite the efforts of Director Fredrickson, the actors and backstage crew, Mama Won’t Fly, is still a mediocre comedy at best. Mama Won’t Fly heads cross country at 7:30 pm on August 10th, 11th, 16tgh, 17th, and 18th with a matinee on the 12th at 2 pm.  Tickets for Apple Hill Playhouse shows and events are only available through the AHP box office which is staffed Mon-Thurs 6-8pm. Outside of those hours, please leave a message at (724) 468-5050 and box office staff will get back to you as soon as possible.

Pittsburgh CLO’s “Millie” is Thoroughly Enjoyable

By: Linda Harkcom

30624097_10155414412141696_2240414847520997376_nTuesday night the Pittsburgh CLO opened its final show of the season, Thoroughly Modern Millie at the Benedum Center for The Performing Arts in Pittsburgh and I have to say, I “thoroughly” enjoyed it from beginning to end.

Having seen the show several times, and knowing the book and the soundtrack nearly word for word, I went into the show with high expectations and high hopes. I was not disappointed. The set and the costumes transported you back to the roaring 20s, as Millie Dillmount a self-proclaimed “modern” arrives in Manhattan from Kansas to make her way in the world. Along the way to meeting the boss/fiancé of her dreams, she meets an interesting cast of characters including Jimmy Smith, a playboy who seems more concerned with fun than having money. [caption id="attachment_7516" align="aligncenter" width="656"]Laurie Veldheer and Bobby Conte Thornton Laurie Veldheer and Bobby Conte Thornton[/caption] Laurie Veldheer and Bobby Conte Thornton were both solid in the lead roles of Millie Dillmount and Jimmy Smith. Both were very vocally strong and I can honestly say having personally heard “Gimme Gimme” probably 200 times in my life, at least, that Veldheer can sing it with the best of them. The duo was backed up by a solid ensemble and a cast of supporting actors who really gave some standout performances. I had heard of the great performance Lenora Nemetz gave in this show at Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey when she also played Mrs. Meers to Veldheer’s Millie, so I was excited to see her perform. She had me from the first “Sad to be all alone in the world.” Nemetz, a Broadway veteran, gave an outstanding performance as the deliciously evil, washed up actress, pretending to be Chinese in order to hide from police and lure victims into her nefarious slave trade operation. In addition to making the audience laugh with her comedic skills, Nemetz blew the audience away with her performance of “They Don’t Know.” [caption id="attachment_7517" align="aligncenter" width="656"]Leslie Uggams and Lenora Nemetz Leslie Uggams and Lenora Nemetz[/caption] Tony and Emmy Award-winning actress Leslie Uggams, Blind Al from “Deadpool” to you millennials, played the role of Muzzy Van Hossmere, a glamorous actress, and singer at a nightclub. Truth be told, in the past, I have never paid much attention to this character but Uggams was not to be ignored. She came onto the stage singing “Only In New York” and showed everyone in the audience exactly why she won a Tony. She received an extended ovation for her performance. Not only did she capture the role vocally but in the brief dressing room scene, the skilled actress took you from laughing to near tears in a matter of minutes. The scenes between Uggams and Nemetz were beyond delightful, watching two skilled masters go back and forth in character was something I will remember and cherish for a long time. Another character I usually do not give much weight to is that of Miss Dorothy Brown. I must admit, I really enjoyed Jessica Fontana’s performance in the role. She is my favorite Miss Dorothy so far. I especially liked her performance of “I’m Falling In Love With Someone” with Paul Schaefer as Trevor Graydon. And then a highlight of any Millie production is the reprise of that song where Graydon and Brown are also joined by the characters of Dillmount and Smith. That number was everything I wanted it to be. Incredible harmonies by very gifted singers. Schaefer’s performance of Graydon was top notch and one I will not soon forget. He and Veldheer expertly tackled the incredibly difficult number “The Speed Test” and throughout the production, his comedic timing and acting choices made the character almost show-stealing. Cast_of_Pittsburgh_CLOs_THOROUGHLY_MODERN_MILLIE._Photo_Matt_PolkAside from perhaps wanting a tiny bit more chemistry between Dillmount and Smith, the show was everything I wanted it to be from the beginning clear through the curtain call. It is definitely one if given the chance I would return to see again. The show runs through Sunday, Aug. 12 and tickets can be purchased at pittsburghclo.org or at the box office at the Benedum Center for the Performing Arts. Photos by Matt Polk
Linda Harkcom is a freelance writer whose writing has appeared in most newspapers in South Western Pennsylvania. She has covered the theatre seen in Westmoreland and Fayette County for almost 10 years.  Having raised two actors, she is the author of DearTheaterMom.com where she gives advice to parents who have children in or thinking of entering the entertainment field. She is also the editor of WPAEntertainmentnews.com a new blog focusing on entertainment in Western Pennsylvania.

Steel Magnolias

By: Alex Walsh
Screenshot (32)The playbill for Little Lake Theatre Company’s Production of Steel Magnolias proclaims that the show is “a Little Lake favorite,” making it a great selection for their 70th anniversary season. Director Lora Oxenreiter and her cast’s clear affection for Robert Harling’s script and their characters shows in the care they bring to the final production. Steel Magnolias is the story of the friendship between a group of women, the staff and clientele of a beauty salon in rural Louisiana in the 80s. Truvy, portrayed by Kauleen Cloutier, is the proprietor of the shop and the heart of the group. Annelle (Italia Nowicki in her third performance of the role), a newcomer to the town and the shop, changes over the course of the show from a timid outsider to a part of the family. Mother and daughter M’Lynn (Carol Ann Schussler) and Shelby (Ellen Emery) provide the dramatic core of the story – which I won’t spoil for those of you who, like me, had never seen the movie. Clairee (Joyce Miller), the town’s former first lady, and her curmudgeonly friend Ouiser (Lynnelle Goins) are also regulars at the shop. Goins, a former student in Little Lake’s “I Can Do That” acting class, delivers a strong acting debut with some of the best laugh lines in the show. Given that the show consists of six close friends in a small space for two hours, the chemistry among the cast is very important. Fortunately for the Little Lake production, the actors mesh perfectly on stage. At the talkback after the show, they said they bonded almost immediately after rehearsals started. This helps sell the sense of community and friendship between them, and their reactions when things get sad later on. The tagline from the old Steel Magnolias trailer was “The funniest movie that will make you cry.” And it just might. The cast is adept at handling both the dramatic and comedic aspects of the play. Cloutier and Nowicki are especially effective at expressing the surrogate mother-daughter bond that develops between Truvy and Annelle. Although the action takes place entirely in one room, the dialogue does a good job of establishing the town outside the shop, and the relevant off-screen characters in our protagonists’ lives. Little Lake Theatre has an in-the-round setup, with seating and tables ringing the stage. The set itself is open enough that every section is visible from all angles and the tables, seats, and couches that make up the perimeter of the salon almost blend into the theater’s seating. For Steel Magnolias, in which the characters are very often seated in the salon, this layout presents a challenge in making sure their backs aren’t turned to any one section of the audience for a long period of time. Oxenreiter addressed this by making good use of swivel chairs to shift subtly between angles. While I did notice once or twice that a conversation was happening with both parties facing away from me, the sound is set up well enough that everything is still audible. And the fact that I only noticed it a couple of times is a testament to how effectively attention is paid to making sure the cast is addressing different parts of the audience throughout the performance. While we’re on the topic of sound. If the costumes don’t remind you that the play is set in the ‘80s, the music will. Shelby introduces a radio into the salon, and a few classic jams pop up in the background or between acts. One fun feature of the Little Lake experience is their menu of specialty desserts and drinks. In addition to their regular selection, they have added a few items that relate to the show – an Armadillo Cake (red velvet with grey icing, as served at Shelby’s wedding reception) and the Blush and Bashful, a very pink cocktail referencing her wedding colors. Make sure you check the menu at the back of the playbill to order for before the show, or to have them brought to your seat at intermission. Steel Magnolias brings a talented cast to a great venue. If you want to have a good night out, maybe cry a little, AND have some cake, you will do well here. The show runs through August 18 at Little Lake Theatre in Canonsburg. For tickets and more information click here.

Catch Me If You Can

By: George Hoover
Catch Me (1) South Park Theatre’s production of Catch Me If You Can has more plot twists and turns than a Parkway West construction detour! However, before we go any further, this show bears no similarity to the 2002 Stephen Spielberg movie or the 2011 Broadway musical by the same name! This is a witty and amusing mystery comedy by Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert that was adapted from a French play by Robert Thomas. It premiered on Broadway in 1965 at the Morosco Theatre. (Broadway Trivia- The Morosco was razed in 1982, along with the first Helen Hayes, the Bijou, and remnants of the Astor and the Gaiety theaters; it was replaced by the 49-story Marriott Marquis hotel and Marquis Theatre.) The play opens with Daniel Corban (James Hartley), an ad man on his honeymoon at his boss’ Catskill lodge. Daniel calls the local police to investigate his new wife’s sudden disappearance. Detective Levine (Michael Shahen) arrives at the cabin to collect the details and investigate. Shortly after that, a pretty young girl (Erin Mcauley), who claims to be his wife arrives accompanied by a priest Father Kelleher (Glenn Brooks) who confirms her identity as Mrs. Corban. Red-herrings keep popping up as the mystery gets more mysterious until it appears Daniel has lost his marbles and clearly needs to spend some time at a “rest home” to get it together. Sydney (Susan Haudenshield), the owner of the local delicatessen, shows up the second morning with the delivery of coffee and brunch, only to wind up dead! Oh, and Father Kelleher winds up dead as too! Then the owner of the cabin shows up. The ingenious twists and turns continue as we in the audience keep guessing until the final minutes of the play when we are justly rewarded. Director Sandy Boggs has assembled a charming cast of experienced, and age appropriate to the role, actors. Michael Shahen’s portrayal of Detective Levine, the slightly bumbling and seemingly very frustrated with this waste of time investigation, is engaging and fun to watch. Erin Mcauley as Daniel’s missing but returned wife kept us wondering all evening; is she or isn’t she? If you went to Central Casting and asked for an actor to portray a Catholic priest, they would surely send you Glenn Brooks. He is perfect in the role in which believability is essential. He dies nicely as well. Susan Haudenshield is quite the hoot as Sydney, the very confident owner, chief, counter man and delivery boy from the without-a-doubt world’s best deli. James Hartley has, in my opinion, the most challenging role to play. His character Daniel is a fizzy, frustrated, concerned, irritated, sometimes believable, and yet sometimes not, kind of guy. He covers all those bases, which makes him a rather unlikeable character, yet we are sympathetic to his plight. Elliott O'Brien and Sarah Parker have brief cameos as Daniel’s boss and his companion. In a show that is seemingly simple, but in reality, is quite complex, Boggs keeps it all together. Directing actors who are playing a character that themselves are acting can get a bit muddled up. In a play that is a murder mystery that’s precisely what you need though to keep the audience engaged. There is a tricky bit of ongoing business with the phone, which requires the right actor to be close to the phone, for their character to answer the call and not someone else. This was handled so well, invisibly in fact, that you really didn’t notice that level of detail until your ride home thinking about how you guessed wrong! The creative team, led by Boggs’ set design, fits the design elements together perfectly. In this type of play, the design work needs to be almost invisible. Set, lights, costumes, props and sound work together to make the play believable without drawing attention to themselves. The rest of the design team, Lighting by Gregg Messmer, Costumes by Annabel Lawrence, Props by Peter Verhaeghe and Sound by Michael Zandhuis, delivers a nicely unified production in the intimate space of the South Park Theatre. Catch Me If You Can delivers an intriguing mystery that will keep on your toes until the end.  Catch Me If You Can at the South Park Theatre now through August 18th on Thursdays, Friday,  and Saturdays at 7:30 pm with Sunday matinees at 2:00 pm. Reservations may be made by leaving a message with the box office at 412-831-8552

Beauty and the Beast

By: Helen Meade
30594689_10155414411821696_4958624366972633088_nThe CLO’s latest offering of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast is an ebullient production, full of color, energy, magic, and fun. The show celebrates vintage Disney and vintage musicals with a retro-design, starting with a 1930s-style video presentation of the show's opening “Prologue.” I loved the simple reveal of the Beast at the end of the prologue. This wonderfully old-fashioned aesthetic continued into the whole set, with scenic designer J. Branson relying on manually controlled pallets, decorative legs,  borders, and painted backdrops to create the world of Beauty and the Beast. There were moments the set felt less than ideally opulent, and the dungeon unit was jarringly disconnected, but otherwise, the set was a treat. Costumes by Tiia Torchia Lager were similar enough to the original Broadway production to satisfy expectations, clever in construction, charming in detail (I particularly liked the floral pattern on Mrs. Potts’ teacup/dress), and rich in texture. Character looks were well put together by Jeff Knaggs’ hair and make-up design, and it all was lit with a stylish eye by lighting designer Paul Miller. Also in line with the overall nostalgia was sound designer Christopher Evans’ cartoonish sound effects, used to create additional layers of comedy for prat-falls, exploding engines, and Gaston’s signature fist-to-face move, as well as the Beast’s roars, thus recalling Disney’s animated Beauty and the Beast and cartoon flavor in general. Opening night saw several timing issues with the sound cues and some snafus with follow-spot and mike pick-ups. I expect most of these missteps will be corrected as the production settles into its run. Musical director James Cunningham kept the tempo hopping throughout and expertly navigated the complex exigencies of coordinating between the staging and the music. [caption id="attachment_7492" align="aligncenter" width="740"]as Gaston (center) and cast Jason Michael Evans as Gaston (center) and cast[/caption] The choreography was consistently entertaining, partaking of the nostalgic style with great effect. Dances were simple when required, and rousing when called for. Of particular note was the tankard dance during Act I’s “Gaston.” Another highlight was the much anticipated “Be Our Guest.” This was a full-on musical spectacular combining fantastical designs, rousing singing, and ever-escalating dancing into the show-stopper number everyone wanted. Stage director Michael Heitzman had some ups and downs with the staging. Small, intimate scenes often saw the actors just standing in a line at the edge of the stage - a use of stage space that was neither interesting nor visually supportive of story development. On the other end of the spectrum, Mr. Heitzman’s staging of the large ensemble scenes was expertly done: great stage pictures, great use of the space, great ability to move large groups of people around in interesting and motivated ways. But, alas, I cannot end on a happy note when it comes to the staging for Beauty and the Beast, since the most egregious staging happened near the very end. The program does not list a fight choreographer, so I don’t know exactly who was responsible for the fights, specifically the final fight between Gaston and the Beast. This fight just didn’t work which ruined the emotional impact of the moment for me. [caption id="attachment_7493" align="aligncenter" width="740"]Cogsworth, Mrs. Potts,  and Lumiere Michael Di Liberto as Cogsworth, Jennifer Hope as Mrs. Potts, and Benjamin Howes as Lumiere[/caption] Kudos to the actors for giving the fight their best try. And kudos to the entire ensemble of Beauty and the Beast for a job well done all around. All of the performances were polished and professional. Voices were universally pleasing, and everyone from soup to salt to rug to wolves threw themselves into the spirit of the show with great effect. James Snyder’s late Act I “If I Can’t Love Her” was well worth the wait and effectively evoked the pathos of Beast. Jessica Grové’s Belle was consistently charming and vocally lovely. Andrew Kruep’s Lefou exhibited terrific physical comedy skills. Jason Michael Evans’ Gaston vocals were wonderfully warm and expansive. The Beast’s servants: Michael Di Liberto as Cogsworth, Benjamin Howes as Lumiere, Jessica Fontana as Babette, Jennifer Hope Wills as Mrs. Potts, and Kirsten Wyatt as Madame De La Grande Bouche, were the perfect combination of funny and sad, laissez-faire and troubled. [caption id="attachment_7494" align="aligncenter" width="740"]James Snyder as Beast and Jessica Grove as Belle James Snyder as Beast and Jessica Grove as Belle[/caption] I must call attention to the stage managers and crew, just for the last 5 minutes of the show, if nothing else! In those last 5 minutes, there were more rail cues, deck cues, lighting cues, sound cues, and quick costume changes than I can readily wrap my head around. Stuff was flying in and out and sideways, and EVERYONE was transforming, and the ensemble had to be safe to sing and dance while all of this craziness was going on....pant, pant, pant. So GREAT JOB to the whole production and artistic team for pulling that last 5 minutes off without a hitch!  (I have to lay down now.) Oh, one last thing, the very best moments of the performance for me were when the four-year-old girl sitting in front of me literally bounced off her seat with joy during “Be Our Guest,” and when a little boy cried out in alarm when Gaston was sneaking up behind the Beast to stab him! It was so sweet, and such a delight to see the children so entertained and entranced by the show, that all of my nit-picking becomes unimportant compared with the joy Beauty and the Beast brought to these kids. The Pittsburgh CLO's production of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast runs through August 5, 2018. For tickets and more information click here. Photos by Archie Carpenter
Stupid F*cking Bird
By: Eva Phillips
PNME Wraps Summer Season with “The Gray Cat and the Flounder”
By: George B. Parous
Heathers the Musical
By: Megan Grabowski
Brigadoon
By: Ringa Sunn
The Wiz
By: George Hoover
Gloria
By: Tiffany Raymond
To love and be loved
By: Helen Meade
Arabella – Pittsburgh Festival Opera
By: George B. Parous
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
By: George Hoover
Big Fish
By: Eva Phillips
A Streetcar Named Desire
By: Helen Meade
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)
By: Corey Hawk
Grease
By: George Hoover
Pittsburgh Festival Opera – Richard Wagner’s “Rhinegold”
By: George B. Parous
The New Renaissance Theatre Company Opens Latest Season
By: Rachelmae Pulliam
The Full Monty
By: Brian Pope
Pittsburgh Festival Opera Off to a Fun Start with “La Bohème Warhola”
By: George B. Parous
PNME Theater of Music Begins Summer Season with “The Human Experience.”
By: George B. Parous
The Bridges of Madison County
By: Brian Pope
Blue Rooms
By: Tiffany Raymond
Ubu Roi
By: Eva Phillips
Titanic the Musical
By: Helen Meade
James and the Giant Peach
By: Brian Pope
Hay Fever
By: George Hoover
Ragtime: The Musical
By: Bec Kashuba
Seasonal Allergies
By: Tiffany Raymond
The Rocky Horror Show
By: Linda Harkcom
On Your Feet!
By: Brian Pope
Steel Magnolias
By: Eva Phillips
William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (abridged)
By: Helen Meade
Arcadia
By: Yvonne Hudson
Orphans
By: Alex Walsh
Building the Wall
By: Ringa Sunn
The Ironweed Tales
By: Eva Phillips
The Cemetery Club
By: George Hoover
Nomad Motel
By: Eva Phillips
Perfect Wedding
By: George Hoover
A New Brain
By: Brian Pope
Social Security
By: Tiffany Raymond
King Hedley II
By: Jason Clearfield
Dogfight
By: Megan Grabowski
Hir
By: George Hoover
Rusalka
By: George B. Parous
Heathers the Musical
By: Eva Phillips
Avenue Q
By: Helen Meade
California Suite
By: Tiffany Raymond
Picasso at the Lapin Agile
By: George Hoover
The Diary of Anne Frank
By: Brian Pope
Hamlet
By: Yvonne Hudson
Forbidden Broadway
By: George Hoover
Big Fish
By: Emily Koscinski
Byhalia, Mississippi
By: Helen Meade
The Dresser
By: Tiffany Raymond
The Elixir of Love
By: George B. Parous
Milo de Venus
By: Eva Phillips
Equus
By: Ringa Sunn
The White Chip
By: Tiffany Raymond
A Bright Room Called Day
By: George Hoover
Of Art and Church Basements: Fringe 2018
By: Mark Skalski
Jane Eyre
By: Ringa Sunn
Recoil
By: Brian Pope
Rushing Horizons
By: George Hoover
Sleeping Beauty Dance Upon a Dream
By: Emily Koscinski
little match girl passion
By: Yvonne Hudson
Heisenberg
By: Jason Clearfield
42nd Street
By: George Hoover
Leading Ladies
By: Helen Meade
Moby-Dick
By: George B. Parous
In House
By: Eva Phillips
The Little Mermaid
By: Brian Pope
Citizens Market
By: Yvonne Hudson
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
By: Helen Meade
The Grand Duke
By: Yvonne Hudson
Inside Passage
By: George Hoover
The House of Bernarda Alba
By: Tiffany Raymond
Oklahoma!
By: Brian Pope
The Drowsy Chaperone
By: George Hoover
Marie Antoinette
By: Mark Skalski
Holmes and Watson
By: Jason Clearfield
Macbeth
By: Tiffany Raymond
Ashes & Snow
By: George B. Parous
Sylvia
By: George Hoover
Madagascar
By: Megan Grabowski
Little Shop of Horrors
By: Helen Meade
A Devil Inside
By: Jason Clearfield
We Will Rock You
By: Ringa Sunn
Evil Dead: The Musical
By: Eva Phillips
In the Heat of the Night
By: Gwenyth Gamble Jarvi
Up and Away
By: Brian Pope
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
By: George Hoover
The Last Five Years
By: Mark Skalski
The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey
By: Brian Pope
Rules of Seconds
By: Eva Phillips
The Long Walk
By: George B. Parous
The Wizard of Oz
By: George Hoover
Sex Werque
By: Jason Clearfield
I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change
By: Helen Meade
A Lyrical Christmas Carol
By: Ringa Sunn
The Nutcracker
By: Emily Koscinski
FEMME
By: Eva Phillips
Amahl and the Night Visitors
By: Helen Meade
That Time of the Year
By: George Hoover
In the Company of Oscar Wilde
By: Mark Skalski
The Gift of the Maji
By: Tiffany Raymond
Midnight Radio A Christmas Story
By: Gwenyth Gamble Jarvi
A Musical Christmas Carol
By: Brian Pope
A Christmas Carol
By: Megan Grabowski
The Carols
By: George Hoover
A Christmas Story
By: Helen Meade
Annie
By: Eva Phillips
In Defense of Gravity
By: Mark Skalski
White Christmas
By: Tiffany Raymond
Love, Love, Love
By: Helen Meade
A Tuna Christmas
By: George Hoover
The Old Man and the Old Moon
By: Mark Skalski
The Humans
By: Tiffany Raymond
Love’s Labor’s Won
By: George Hoover
James and the Giant Peach Jr.
By: Emily Koscinski
The Impresaria and Djamileh
By: George Hoover
Arsenic and Old Lace
By: Mark Skalski
The Silver Theater Project Presents Mother Tongue
By: George Hoover
You on the Moors Now
By: Brian Pope
Parade
By: Yvonne Hudson
Annie
By: Megan Grabowski
The Busy Body
By: Mark Skalski
All Quiet on the Western Front
By: Tiffany Raymond
The Marriage of Figaro
By: George B. Parous
The Crucible
By: George Hoover
Beauty and the Beast
By: Gwenyth Gamble Jarvi
The Hard Problem
By: Yvonne Hudson
Mythburgh: Round 2 with 12 Peers
By: Tiffany Raymond
Clue: The Musical
By: Mark Skalski
Belfast Girls
By: Yvonne Hudson
Angelmakers: Songs for Female Serial Killers
By: George Hoover
Romeo and Juliet
By: Yvonne Hudson
Xanadu
By: Brian Pope
Kiss Me, Kate
By: George Hoover
I Won’t Be in on Monday
By: Eva Phillips
DODO
By: Meredith Rigsby
Unhinged
By: Alex Walsh
H.M.S. Pinafore
By: Helen Meade
The Last of the Boys
By: Tiffany Raymond
Mary Poppins
By: Emily Koscinski
The Seven Voyages of Sinbad
By: Mark Skalski
Side Show
By: Tiffany Raymond
Our Town
By: Helen Meade
The Matchmaker
By: Megan Grabowski
Equus
By: Brian Pope
Tosca
By: George B. Parous
Boundless
By: Eva Phillips
East Texas Hot Links
By: Jason Clearfield
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York City
By: Brian Pope
Orphie and the Book of Heroes
By: George Hoover
Middletown
By: Helen Meade
PNWF 2017: Program D
By: Ringa Sunn
Some Assembly Required
By: George Hoover
The Goodbye Girl
By: Mark Skalski
Jekyll and Hyde
By: Eva Phillips
PNWF 2017: Program C
By: Tiffany Raymond
The Homestead Strike of 1892
By: Yvonne Hudson
Boeing, Boeing
By: George Hoover
The Scottsboro Boys
By: Patricia Thornweilder
A Masterpiece of Comic…Timing
By: Mark Skalski
Henry V
By: Cayleigh Boniger
Six a Breast: The Absurd Life of Women
By: George Hoover
PNWF 2017: Program A
By: Mark Skalski
Schoolhouse Rock Live
By: George Hoover
PNWF 2017: Program B
By: Megan Grabowski
Red Hills
By: Eva Phillips
Annie
By: Ringa Sunn
Big Fish
By: Mark Skalski
The Audience
By: Eva Phillips
Go Back for Murder
By: George Hoover
Billy Elliot
By: George Hoover
Cloud 9
By: Brian Pope
Little Shop of Horrors
By: Mark Skalski
Million Dollar Quartet
By: Brian Pope
Mamma Mia
By: Eva Phillips
Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play
By: Jason Clearfield
Rumors
By: Mark Skalski
Avenue Q
By: George Hoover
Macbeth
By: Eva Phillips
Resounding Sound
By: Roxy Lillard
Spamalot
By: Megan Grabowski
Wonder of the World
By: George Hoover
Intermezzo
By: George B. Parous
Newsies
By: Brian Pope
Peter Pan
By: Emily Koscinski
The Liar
By: Cayleigh Boniger
Xerxes
By: George B. Parous
Seussical: The Musical!
By: George Hoover
Pippin
By: Mark Skalski
In the Heights
By: Brian Pope
One Man, Two Guvnors
By: Mark Skalski
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
By: George B. Parous
A Night of Mini Splendors at the Glitterbox!
By: Eva Phillips
The Tempest
By: Ringa Sunn
In the Next Room or the Vibrator Play
By: Eva Phillips
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
By: Emily Koscinski
The Christians
By: Patricia Thornweilder
The Little Mermaid
By: Brian Pope
Clue: The Musical
By: George Hoover
A Gathering of Sons – World Premiere
By: George B. Parous
Proof
By: Eva Phillips
An Act of God
By: Brian Pope
Chicago
By: Stephen Arch
Thom Pain (based on nothing)
By: Patricia Thornweilder
An American in Paris
By: George Hoover
The Next Stop
By: Eva Phillips
Watch: A Haunting
By: Jason Clearfield
The Philadelphia Story
By: Mark Skalski
Undercroft Opera Presents Puccini’s “La Rondine.”
By: George B. Parous
Violet
By: Brian Pope
Ironbound
By: Yvonne Hudson
Anything Goes
By: George Hoover
Peter and the Starcatcher
By: George Hoover
Resonance Works Presents Verdi’s “Falstaff.”
By: George B. Parous
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
By: Mark Skalski
Hercules Didn’t Wade in the Water
By: Victor C. Leroi
Sive
By: Cayleigh Boniger
Tarzan
By: Brian Pope
Death of a Salesman
By: Eva Phillips
Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical
By: Stephen Arch
Peter and the Starcatcher
By: Nicole Tafe
Wife U
By: Jason Clearfield
The Summer King – The Josh Gibson Story
By: George B. Parous
True West
By: Brian Pope
What’s Missing?
By: Eva Phillips
4.48 Psychosis
By: Megan Grabowski
Wild With Happy
By: George Hoover
The Three Musketeers
By: Stephen Arch
Collaborators
By: Yvonne Hudson
Uncle Tom’s Cabin Or The Most Popular American Play You’ve Never Seen
By: George Hoover
Lights Out
By: Jason Clearfield
Baltimore
By: Mark Skalski
Peter and the Starcatcher
By: Brian Pope
Oedipus Rex
By: George Hoover
Turandot
By: George B. Parous
The Guard
By: Mark Skalski
Sweet Charity
By: Yvonne Hudson
Daddy Long Legs
By: George Hoover
Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson
By: Alex Walsh
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
By: Ringa Sunn
Dreamgirls
By: Kellie Gormly
Polish Joke
By: Stephen Arch
Forever Plaid
By: Mark Skalski
1984
By: Jason Clearfield
Findings
By: Brian Pope
Patience
By: George Hoover
Ragtime
By: Jason Clearfield
Big Love
By: Stephen Arch
Rust
By: Ringa Sunn
As One
By: George B. Parous
The Pink Unicorn
By: Mark Skalski
The Complete History of America (abridged)
By: Stephen Arch
The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
By: George Hoover
Pump Boys and Dinettes
By: Victor C. Leroi
Woody’s Order!
By: Kellie Gormly
Twelfth Night
By: Yvonne Hudson
The Royale
By: Jason Clearfield
The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity
By: Mark Skalski
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
By: Kellie Gormly
Cabaret: The Musical
By: George Hoover
Richard the Lionheart (“Riccardo primo, re d’Inghilterra”)
By: George B. Parous
Into the Woods
By: George Hoover
A Christmas Carol
By: Mark Skalski
The Best Christmas Pageant Ever: The Musical
By: Victor C. Leroi
A Musical Christmas Carol
By: Megan Grabowski
The Nutcracker
By: Claire Juozitis
A Good Old Fashioned Redneck Country Christmas
By: George Hoover
The Lion in Winter
By: Isaac Crow
Unbolted
By: Eva Phillips
Lungs
By: Victor C. Leroi
Midnight Radio Holiday Spectaular
By: Kellie Gormly
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat
By: Mark Skalski
Mr. Marmalade
By: Jason Clearfield
Between Riverside and Crazy
By: Patricia Thornweilder
The Rover
By: Mark Skalski
Three Days in the Country
By: George Hoover
The Sea
By: Eva Phillips
The Music Man
By: Megan Grabowski
Hair
By: Jason Clearfield
12 Angry Men
By: Mark Skalski
How I Learned to Drive
By: Meredith Rigsby
The Merchant of Venice
By: Yvonne Hudson
Salome
By: George B. Parous
To Kill a Mockingbird
By: Kellie Gormly
Yankee Tavern
By: Eva Phillips
Giselle
By: Chloe Kinnahan
Feeding the Dragon
By: Victor C. Leroi
Midnight Radio’s Night of the Living Dead N’at
By: Claire Juozitis
Barefoot in the Park
By: Victor C. Leroi
Prometheus Bound: A Puppet Tragedy
By: Yvonne Hudson
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
By: Mark Skalski
Carrie: The Musical
By: Eva Phillips
The Who’s Tommy
By: Isaac Crow
Pride and Prejudice
By: Yvonne Hudson
Jekyll & Hyde
By: Kellie Gormly
An Accident
By: Yvonne Hudson
Trial by Jury and Gianni Schicchi
By: Nichole Faina
The River
By: Mark Skalski
Intimate Apparel
By: Eva Phillips
The Fantasticks
By: Isaac Crow
La Traviata
By: George B. Parous
The Playboy of the Western World
By: Jason Clearfield
Avenue Q
By: Eva Phillips
I’m Gonna Pray for You So Hard
By: Victor C. Leroi
Hand to God
By: Yvonne Hudson
Titus Andronicus
By: George Hoover
The Toxic Avenger
By: Isaac Crow
PNWF Program D
By: Chloe Kinnahan
The Censor
By: Eva Phillips
Next to Normal
By: Mark Skalski
PNWF Program C
By: Victor C. Leroi
Beauty and the Beast
By: Mark Skalski
PNWF Program B
By: Eva Phillips
Wig Out!
By: Isaac Crow
Remains — A One Woman Show
By: Jason Clearfield
Shirley Valentine
By: Yvonne Hudson
The Comedy of Errors
By: Jason Clearfield
PNWF Program A
By: Megan Grabowski
Floyd Collins
By: Nichole Faina
A History of the American Film
By: Eva Phillips
This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things
By: Megan Grabowski
Loot
By: George Hoover
Driftless
By: Mark Skalski
Peribáñez
By: Jason Clearfield
The Birds
By: Mark Skalski
Seven Guitars
By: Yvonne Hudson
South Pacific
By: George Hoover
Aida
By: Drake Ma
American Idiot
By: Isaac Crow
Jesus Christ Superstar
By: Drake Ma
Julius Caesar
By: Nichole Faina
The Hound of the Baskervilles
By: Isaac Crow
A Pirate’s Tale
By: Megan Grabowski
The Silent Woman
By: George B. Parous
Night Caps
By: George B. Parous
Come Back, Little Sheba
By: Jason Clearfield
Shrek: The Musical
By: Isaac Crow
A Midsommer Nights Dreame
By: Mark Skalski
Julius Caesar
By: George B. Parous
Anything Goes
By: Nichole Faina
Anna in the Tropics
By: Mark Skalski
Eff.UL.Gents
By: Megan Grabowski
Kiss Me, Kate
By: George B. Parous
Damn Yankees
By: Isaac Crow
Krapp’s Last Tape/Not I
By: Jason Clearfield
Church Basement Ladies
By: Mark Skalski
Bloody Hell
By: Mark Skalski
SummerFest’s Tour of “Carmen the Gypsy” is On!
By: George B. Parous
Judgement at Nuremberg
By: Jason Clearfield
Venus in Fur
By: Yvonne Hudson
The Theatre Festival in Black and White, Delivering Fantastically
By: Jason Clearfield
The Consorts
By: Victor C. Leroi
The Spitfire Grill
By: Isaac Crow
The 39 Steps
By: Isaac Crow
Undercroft Opera Sinks Its Teeth into Mozart’s “Don Giovanni.”
By: George B. Parous
The Lion
By: Drake Ma
Assassins
By: Drake Ma
The Giver
By: Yvonne Hudson
Cock
By: Drew Praskovich
Two Tales of Terror
By: Chloe Kinnahan
The Musical of Musicals
By: Drake Ma
Autism and the Arts: Bricolage Creates Sensory-Sensitive Immersive Experience
By: Jack Lake
Spring Awakening
By: Isaac Crow
Tru
By: Drew Praskovich
The Rake’s Progress
By: George B. Parous
Grease
By: Drake Ma
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
By: Isaac Crow
Laws of Attraction
By: Chloe Kinnahan
The Last Match
By: Isaac Crow
White Rabbit Red Rabbit
By: Drew Praskovich
The Master Builder
By: Yvonne Hudson
The Flick
By: Isaac Crow
The Barber of Seville
By: George B. Parous
Sister Act
By: Drake Ma
Sex with Strangers
By: Drew Praskovich
The Drowsy Chaperone
By: Isaac Crow
Disgraced
By: Isaac Crow
Miss Julie, Clarissa, and John
By: Yvonne Hudson
The Pirates of Penzance
By: Megan Grabowski
The Bluest Eye
By: Jack Lake
Sister’s Easter Catechism
By: Jack Lake
The Full Monty
By: Drew Praskovich
“27” (“Twenty-Seven”)
By: George B. Parous
First Date
By: Isaac Crow
Saturday Night Fever
By: Drake Ma
Guys and Dolls
By: Drake Ma
Some Brighter Distance
By: Yvonne Hudson
Mother Lode
By: Megan Grabowski
Ciara
By: Isaac Crow
Little Women
By: George B. Parous
The Sisters
By: Megan Grabowski
Oliver Twist
By: Drake Ma
Danny and the Deep Blue Sea
By: Nathaniel Quinn
Macbeth
By: Drew Praskovich
Scared of Sarah
By: Megan Grabowski
Yinz’r Scrooged
By: Nathaniel Quinn
Chickens in the Yard
By: Nathaniel Quinn
The Rocky Horror Show
By: Megan Grabowski
Sunset Baby
By: Isaac Crow
A Servant to Two Masters
By: Isaac Crow
The Wild Duck
By: Drew Praskovich
Così fan tutte
By: George B. Parous
1984 (Midnight Radio)
By: Isaac Crow
Oliver
By: Drake Ma
Brainpeople
By: Drew Praskovich
Into the Woods
By: Drake Ma
The Night Alive
By: Jack Lake
Iolanthe
By: Drew Praskovich
Nabucco
By: George B. Parous
Altar Boyz
By: Drake Ma
Death of a Salesman
By: Megan Grabowski
The Diary of Anne Frank
By: Drew Praskovich
Dulcy
By: Drake Ma
Stand Up Horror
By: John Nau
Choir Boy
By: Isaac Crow
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Program D
By: Drake Ma
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Program C
By: John Nau
The Winter’s Tale
By: George B. Parous
Games of the Mind
By: Drake Ma
Dead Accounts
By: John Nau
King Lear
By: John Nau
Educating Rita
By: Isaac Crow
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Program B
By: Drew Praskovich
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Program A
By: Megan Grabowski
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Staged Readings
By: Megan Grabowski
Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s Staged Readings
By: Drake Ma
The Light in the Piazza
By: Isaac Crow
Exit Laughing
By: John Nau
Be My Baby
By: John Nau
The Heart of Shahrazad
By: Drake Ma
The Winter’s Tale
By: John Nau
The Merchant of Venice
By: Jack Lake
Kinky Boots
By: Isaac Crow
Outside Mullingar
By: John Nau
It Could Be Any One Of Us
By: Chloe Detrick
Capriccio
By: George B. Parous
The Wedding Singer
By: Isaac Crow
Strength and Grace
By: Chloe Kinnahan
Sharon’s Grave
By: Isaac Crow
Medea
By: Isaac Crow
“New Kind of Fallout” – World Premiere
By: George B. Parous
The Drowsy Chaperone
By: Megan Grabowski
How To Be a GoodPerson™
By: John Nau
Sherlock’s Last Case
By: Isaac Crow
Much Adoe About Nothing
By: Chloe Detrick
Damn Yankees
By: George B. Parous
Gypsy
By: Isaac Crow
The Marriage of Figaro
By: George B. Parous
Brewed
By: John Nau
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
By: Chloe Detrick
Man of La Mancha
By: Isaac Crow
Lucky Guy
By: John Nau
Out of This Furnace
By: Dale Hess
The Ruling Class
By: Chloe Detrick
Mary Poppins
By: Isaac Crow
Buyer and Cellar
By: Isaac Crow
How the Other Half Loves
By: John Nau
The Best of Everything
By: Justin Sines
Knickers
By: Tyler Plosia
Midsummer
By: Corey Hawk
The Last Five Years
By: Isaac Crow
Fences
By: Chloe Detrick
Saints Tour
By: Isaac Crow
Detroit
By: John Nau
American Falls
By: Justin Sines
Someething’s Afoot
By: John Nau
Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris
By: Mara E. Nadolski
“Daughter of the Regiment” (La fille du régiment)
By: George B. Parous
The Whale
By: Sarah Beth Martin
My Way
By: John Nau
Peter Pan
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Othello
By: Isaac Crow
A Streetcar Name Desire
By: Jack Lake
Lunch Lady Cabaret
By: John Nau
Lovecraft’s Monsters
By: Chloe Detrick
All the Names
By: Chloe Detrick
The Rocky Horror Show
By: Isaac Crow
Oblivion
By: Justin Sines
Endless Lawns
By: Tyler Plosia
The Disappearing
By: John Nau
Carmen
By: George B. Parous
How I Learned What I Learned
By: Jack Lake
Animal Farm
By: Dale Hess
Elemeno Pea
By: Jack Lake
The Mikado
By: Mara E. Nadolski
Young Frankenstein
By: Isaac Crow
Ghosts
By: Isaac Crow
The Boyfriend
By: Isaac Crow
The Wiz
By: Chloe Detrick
For the Tree to Drop
By: Jack Lake
Wolves
By: Dale Hess
Boeing, Boeing
By: Isaac Crow
Existence and the Single Girl
By: Justin Sines
Prussia: 1866
By: Jack Lake
Brahman/i
By: Isaac Crow
Mr. Joy
By: Chloe Detrick
My Fair Lady
By: Jack Lake
The Little Mermaid
By: Chloe Detrick
Rodelinda
By: George B. Parous
Or
By: Isaac Crow
Christmas Star
By: Chloe Detrick
Urinetown
By: Isaac Crow
It’s a Wonderful Life
By: Jack Lake
The Santaland Diaries
By: Isaac Crow
A Streetcar Named Desire
By: Isaac Crow
L’Hôtel au Purgatoire
By: Isaac Crow
Evita
By: Jack Lake
Avenue Q
By: Isaac Crow
As You Like It
By: Isaac Crow
Otello
By: George B. Parous
Murder for Two
By: Justin Sines
SCarrie: The Musical
By: Jack Lake
The Last Day of Judas Iscariot
By: Justin Sines
The Small Room at the Top of the Stairs
By: Jack Lake
Outside Mullingar
By: Isaac Crow
The Glass Menagerie
By: Jack Lake
Macbeth
By: Isaac Crow
Sons of War
By: Isaac Crow
Doubt: A Parable
By: Justin Sines
Of Mice and Men
By: Isaac Crow
Bus Stop
By: Corey Hawk
Parade
By: Isaac Crow
Tamara
By: Isaac Crow
Romance
By: Isaac Crow
Fixing King John
By: Corey Hawk
“Ariadne on Naxos” (“Ariadne auf Naxos”)
By: George B. Parous