Spamalot

spamalotI love musicals for the interlude of melodrama and escape they provide from my tragically mundane life. The singing and dancing, costumes, and live orchestra swelling between me and the stage make my heart happy. Opening night of Stage 62’s production of Monty Python’s Spamalot has me beyond excited. This is my first time seeing Spamalot but I am familiar with the zany British sketch comedy of Monty Python and the absurdist humor that forces you to laugh, even if you aren’t sure what you are seeing and hearing is stupid beyond measure or ridiculously hilarious. As I wait for the curtain to rise, I can’t imagine disappointment.

Rob James and Carl Hunt
Rob James and Carl Hunt

Spamalot is a parody of the 1975 film, Monty Python and The Holy Grail. Theatergoers who have never seen the film will not be left in the dark. The musical, ‘lovingly ripped off from the motion picture’, maintains much of the plot of the film, (or what there is of a plot amongst the craziness of smutty French soliders, a killer rabbit, knights who say “Ni” and the impossible task of locating Jews for a Broadway musical). Spamalot takes place in 932 A.D. England, when King Arthur, played by renowned Rob James and the animated Carl Hunt cast as his servant Patsy, traverse the country in search of recruits for the Round Table at Camelot. King Arthur’s first 2 volunteers, Matthew Rush as Robin and Jeremy Spoljarick playing Lancelot are soon followed by a political radical, Sir Galahad played by Chad Elder and Nick Mitchell as Sir Bedevere. After some convincing by, leading lady, Stephanie Ottey as The Lady of the Lake and her Laker Girls the troupe arrive in Camelot. Once there they are contacted by God, the voice of Marcus Stevens, fresh from the Pittsburgh Public Theater’s prominent performance An Act of God, who instructs the knights to locate the Holy Grail. The men receive more encouragement from The Lady of the Lake and set off traveling the land, visiting a French castle, a dark and “very expensive” forest, and a frightfully comic run in with The Black Knight.

L-R Nick Mitchell, Matthew J. Rush, Rob James, Jeremy Spoljarick, Carl Hunt, Chad Elder
L-R Nick Mitchell, Matthew J. Rush, Rob James, Jeremy Spoljarick, Carl Hunt, Chad Elder

The Knights of the Round Table are next tasked with finding Jews for a Broadway musical then Lancelot runs off to rescue a damsel in distress and The Lady in the Lake is ticked off for not getting enough stage time. All of these experiences are expounded through madcap musical numbers, some ripping off other well known musicals. Songs such as “I Am Not Dead Yet”, “The Song That Goes Like This”, “Knights of the Round Table”, “You Won’t Succeed On Broadway”, “Whatever Happened to My Part?” and “His Name is Lancelot” will without a doubt cause laughter. There is so much more hair- brained chaos I would hate to spoil the show by revealing too much, but I assure you, with the help of the audience, the Holy Grail is found and a Broadway-esque musical is successfully performed, nonsensical perhaps but loads of fun.

Stephanie Ottey
Stephanie Ottey

Typical of Stage 62 productions, Spamalot’s cast is bursting with talent. Aside from James and Ottey, each lead is cast in multiple roles, which requires many costume changes and sometimes different accents and it all appears effortless. The cast includes many accomplished thespians, but it is without a doubt James and Ottey who steal the show. Their strong voices and mastered characterization are delightful to watch. Ottey’s diva flourish and Jame’s execution as King, provide moments of side stitching hilarity. The ensemble is a tight bunch, especially The Laker Girls. After seeing several musicals at Stage 62 I am confident in reporting the choreography for Spamalot is by far the best I have ever seen. Hats off to choreographer Devyn Brown for creating routines that are energized and engaging, especially, ”Fisch Schlapping Song”, “I Am Not Dead Yet”, “Knights of the Round Table” and “His Name Is Lancelot”. Becki Toth’s skilled stage direction allows the cast to emanate ease in movements and smooth scene changes on a small stage, all of which translate into a show well done.

I will offer you with a trigger warning: if easily offended by the offensive, if you are uncomfortable with bawdy jokes, parodies, preposterous plots, ‘little boy’ type humor often revolving around flatulence, then perhaps you might lighten up just a bit. This is a summer show you don’t want to miss. Spamalot does not make much sense but that doesn’t matter. The show is for grins, starring a tremendously talented cast and crew who clearly aim for having as much fun on stage as the audience does watching them.

If planning to attend a performance of Spamalot be aware that the venue has a major construction project happening right now and there is no parking on their property. Neighborhood side streets may offer a few spaces. The theater company has a shuttle service that will transport you from the parking lot on Main Street in downtown Carnegie, up the hill to the entrance of their building.

Spamalot runs at the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall through July 30. For tickets and more information click here

Special thanks to Stage 62 for complimentary press tickets. Photos courtesy of Friedman Wagner-Dobler.